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Lvl99Curmudgeon
Lvl99Curmudgeon

Before people come in shouting racism and WTF and "lol wat, allow me a moment to divulge to you some artistic critique sense.

Art is not just a pretty picture. Art is a VISUAL representation of an idea, combined with a sense of style from the artist, and execution of the piece. This particular piece of art is more specifically called “Performance art”, where people are hired to act as part f the piece and the message therein.

This is a work that invites interpretation.

How many people looked at this and thought it was a message on the Corporate beating of lower class minorities and races? What if I told you that the previous installation of this piece had a white man polishing the shoes? How would this change your outlook on the piece?

What is being said, exactly? More so OUTSIDE the consumerism outlook? The man is not chained to the piece. Is that meant to imply that we willingly give ourselves over to to these corporate entities? Or is it to imply that we, at any pint, can run away from our captors?

I love art in all forms. So much more than a pretty picture.

+50
Selym
Selym

in reply to Lvl99Curmudgeon

I believe the chains that bind us are psychological. We are made to feel that we can not escape. I think the piece illustrates that psychological binding well. The stern expression of Ronald McDonald has a sense of power and confidence, while the shoe shiner has an expression that shows hopelessness. Like he has given up on any notion of resistance and accepts his place beneath the heel of McDonald. Almost literally. A majority of his body is lower than McDonald’s shoe.

+7
WarriorTang
WarriorTang

in reply to Lvl99Curmudgeon

When art tells a message, it becomes subject to the same criticism as any other message in the social sphere. Is the message justified? People might look at this and say no, it’s a slander, McDonald’s is not like that. Especially if they would be happy to have a job at McDonald’s, like the million people who applied for one of their 50,000 new jobs two years ago and didn’t get in. Others might say yes, it is like that. You can’t make a living on McDonald’s wages. There are currently protests demanding McDonald’s raise its workers’ wages. This is probably a sign of support for the protests in addition to any other statements it may be making.

I find it funny that these guys are being paid to perform menial work in an art exhibit to mock the worker/employer relationship.

+3
Selym
Selym

in reply to WarriorTang

Don’t forget that with art the message isn’t delivered directly. The message is interpreted from the medium, and that message can be different from person to persons.

You see a metaphor for the worker employee relationship. Others might see this as a metaphor for class warfare. Others might view this on a statement on greed in general. Someone else might glean some message from this that I can’t even see.

You look at McDonald in this as literally being Ronal McDonald. Someone else might view him as a symbol for something else.

You can critique this any way you want. After all, to critique something all you have to do is talk about what you like and what you don’t like about something. Literally anyone can do it. If you critique the message of a piece of art, though, are you critiquing the artist, or did you just critique yourself.

You are the one that derived the message.

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