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Egypt elects first President

Last posted Jul 04, 2012 at 06:07PM EDT. Added Jun 25, 2012 at 07:53AM EDT
11 posts from 6 users

While a civil war rages in Syria, the largest player in the Arab Spring, Egypt, has chosen it’s first democratically elected leader in its Entire 7000 year history.

The choice however, is most surprising. Mohammed Mursi, representing the Muslim Brotherhood (known locally as the “Ikhawn”) is now Egypt’s President.

This is an incredible turnaround in historic fortunes, ever since 1928, when the group was founded, it’s members have been repeatedly at odds with nearly every Egyptian leader including assassination attempts as well as regular crackdowns on its members by the each successive government.

Now their tormentor, Hosni Mubarak, is in prison while they set in the presidency.

But who the fuck is Mursi anyway?

Mohammed Morsi was born in a village in the Nile Delta region of Egypt in 1951 (conflicting reports that he was born either middle class or a Peasant) and graduated from Cairo University’s Metallurgical Engineering department with a Master’s Degree and got his Doctorate from University of Southern California in 1982 before working as an assistant Professor at California State University and according to some reports, he worked at NASA’s Space Shuttle Program, designing alloys for the high temperature of the engines. He then returned to Egypt to teach at his hometown’s university: Zagazig University (yes, it sounds just as silly in Arabic).

He was involved in the Brotherhood ever since his early college years (Ironically, Anwar Sadat the Egyptian President at the time encouraged the Brotherhood to counteract the power of Communist Student organizations) and was a member of the rubber stamp parliament from 2000 to 2005 (running as an independent as most Ikhwan did).

People were afraid of the Brotherhood domination of the government but it seems that will not be the case:

The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) has dissolved parliament (which was controlled by the Ikhwan with nearly 47% of the seats and a further 20% controlled by their allies the Ultra-orthodox Islamists known as Salafists) and stated in nearly plain terms: The President answers to the Army, not the other way around The Constitution has yet to be written so what powers, if any, does Mursi have? No one has a fucking clue.

In addition, Morsi only got 51.73% of the vote in which about 51% of the Electorate participated which means really only about a quarter of Egyptians voted for him.

And the real question is: What the fuck is the Brotherhood going to do with Egypt?

Many people were afraid that Egypt is going to be a theocracy but that’s just silly, the Ikhwan don’t have that kind of power but the three issues that people are worried about are:

#1: The extent of the Muslim Brotherhood’s social conservatism on the Tourism Industry: As we all know, Egypt depends on Tourism, not just to the Pyramids but also resorts on the Red Sea like Sharm Al Sheik. If Egypt adopts a “No Bikini, No Beer” rule, it will seriously damage the economy.

#2: The status of the Camp David Accords and the Issue of Gaza: Camp David was the Israeli Egyptian peace plan brokered by Jimmy Carter and is deeply unpopular in Egypt. However, breaking that agreement might attract Israeli aggression and will certainly bring International Condemnation. Also, will the new government continue to enforce the blockade on the Gaza Strip?

#3: The treatment of Christians and other Minorities: An Islamist ruled government stoked fears that oppression of minorities like Coptic Christians would begin but in reality this doesn’t seem to be forthcoming. The Brotherhood never had any real interaction with minorities for most of its history, being solely focused on overthrowing the secular government and frankly, with only 25% of the electorate voting for him, Morsi and the Brotherhood are already courting Christians, Leftists and other groups to form a unity government. They don’t have the political strength to oppress anyone.


Why is Egypt so Important? Well…. 1 in 3 Arabs is an Egyptian. Whatever Egypt does is felt by every Arab in the world. Whatever Egypt does, it will shift the course of history in the Middle East.

Because this is History in the making folks, is your body ready?

Last edited Jun 25, 2012 at 07:54AM EDT
Jun 25, 2012 at 07:53AM EDT
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No surprise, the other candidate actually supports dictatorship.

But the Muslim Brotherhood doesn’t really have experience in leadership, must be a big step for them though.

Jun 25, 2012 at 10:44AM EDT

Hmm, I’ve no idea what will occur in the next month with him…

Jun 25, 2012 at 12:49PM EDT
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Well some people have set up a website:

http://morsimeter.com/

Basically, Morsi has made 64 promises that he said he would accomplish or begin to deal with in the first 100 days of his presidency (Which begins on 1st of July)

The website is currently only in Arabic but hopefully it will be translated into English soon but the main categories from Top Left: Security, Transportation, Bread, Sanitation and Fuel.

I’ll consider translating some if people are interested.

Jun 25, 2012 at 01:02PM EDT
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@Phoneix

Go ahead and translate

This will be an interesting turn of events. I think the question on a lot of people’s minds right now is if the Egyptian goverment really will change or just shadow what it was before

Jun 25, 2012 at 07:37PM EDT
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burning_phoneix wrote:

Well some people have set up a website:

http://morsimeter.com/

Basically, Morsi has made 64 promises that he said he would accomplish or begin to deal with in the first 100 days of his presidency (Which begins on 1st of July)

The website is currently only in Arabic but hopefully it will be translated into English soon but the main categories from Top Left: Security, Transportation, Bread, Sanitation and Fuel.

I’ll consider translating some if people are interested.

My Chrome can’t translate it, huh…

But translate for us phoneix, it would be interesting what he has planned for Egypt. I’m learning Arabic, but not at an acceptable rate.

Jun 26, 2012 at 12:40AM EDT

Dinner wrote:

The most disappointing revolution ever.

Hey, the French Revolution ended not with a democracy but with an Empire. The Communist revolution kind of the same thing :P

I’ll start with Security. I’m not a professional translator so sorry if this sounds awkward.

  1. Administer Promotions, Raises and Incentives to police officers based on their ability to keep their precincts safe.
  1. Administer Promotions, Raises and Incentives to police officers based on public satisfaction of their performance.
  1. Grant all police officers full insurance for work related risks.
  1. Large PR campaign to increase the trust of the people in the police force.
  1. Arresting police officers and hired thugs who break the law and re-educating them to become proper citizens
  1. Increasing the street patrol schedule.
  1. Neighborhood watches that coordinate with the local police force in local matters and constantly in contact via hotlines.
  1. (I don’t understand this one very well. Basically it’s another hotline for Emergencies? Don’t they have 911?)
  1. Increase police stations depending on the population of an area.
  1. Installing surveillance Cameras in lively areas to ease the arrest of criminals
  1. Increase use of Helicopters to monitor traffic violations on major highways.
  1. Redeveloping incarceration rooms in Police stations and courts to be fit for human use.
  1. Designating a PR officer in every precinct whose task is to receive citizen’s complaints and solve them
  1. Announcing rapid training courses from the police academy for recent graduates of Law, Physical Education and Social Service schools to train new officers for safer precincts while more experienced officers are transferred to more active precincts.
  1. Rewarding citizens who offer information that leads to the solving of a crime as well as instituting witness protection laws.
  1. Purchasing new police cruisers with on board computers networked to the Interior Ministry’s network.
  1. Putting fair work hours and vacation time for officers as well as fair compensation for working overtime.

That’s it. I’ll translate more later.

Jun 26, 2012 at 01:09AM EDT
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Maybe I missed the attitude of your summary by a mile, but given your summary of the current state of affairs, everything seems fairly optimistic for the time being. If this is any example, and Egypt will set a precedent for the Middle East, then my body is ready.

Jun 27, 2012 at 10:44PM EDT
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I’m just a fairly optimistic person by nature so I guess that shows through my summary. You can talk to a lot of other people who to them the situation seems like the WORST THING EVER!

Well, hindsight will be 20/20

Jul 04, 2012 at 06:07PM EDT
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Skeletor-sm

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