Forums / Discussion / General

170,930 total conversations in 5,486 threads

+ New Thread


Featured Featured
Syrian Conflict

Last posted Aug 30, 2013 at 11:27PM EDT. Added Aug 22, 2012 at 04:56PM EDT
156 posts from 39 users

Does he really think he can win, with the odds stacked so against him?

“Asshead” lol, nice.

Anyway, even if he does win, I’m sure he will never get back the country he just destroyed. He will be left ruling only a smoldering husk, a mere shadow of what the nation once was.

All the credibility he once had as a ruler is already gone, permanently. And that will render it impossible for him to bring Syria back to its former self under his rule. The only thing he can do is lose. The FSA just have to make sure Syria doesn’t go down with him.

Sep 04, 2012 at 02:10AM EDT
Quote

@Twins:

History tells us that counter-revolutions DO win from time to time. A lot of civil wars end up with the regime still in power more often than not so Assad does believe he has a solid chance of winning, considering that Russia and China are blocking any outside action against him.

Sep 04, 2012 at 02:29AM EDT
Quote


Today, Bustan Al-Basha, Aleppo.

The daily death toll is back high at 216 dead. Most of which in Damascus, Aleppo and the eastern provinces.
It appears that the SAF forces have completely restored the Sallah Al-Deen in Aleppo neighborhood after 45 days of continous fighting, that neighborhood was the first that the FSA have taken, and it’s considered one of the strategically toughest to capture, the FSA are yet to comment on their supposed loss in that district.
Meanwhile he attack on military airports by the FSA continues.
Al-Bo Kamal’s airport was under attack costing the regime many airplanes, the specidied number is not known, but today 3 airplanes were shot-down mid-flight, Here’s a vid of a shot-down MiG-21 and it’s deceased pilot:LINK


Also it appears that calling in reservists was indeed out of need, but There are rumors of a full mobilization what will be ordered.


@Burning Phoenix:
SO let me get this straight:

  • No troops, so he calls in reserves who are most likely to defect or desert
  • No munitions, so he uses improvised bombs.
  • No spare parts, so he uses training aircraft and recon planes as bombers.
  • Not enough logistic support, so he chooses to bulldoze buildings instead of bombing them.
  • Not enough money, so he bargains to sell Crude Oil at super-cheap prices.
  • And then Russia starts thinking like this.

Yeah, I’m not seeing it.
He may make the Resistance lose, but he will lose with them.


One last vid, Peekaboo, Nightmare difficulty:

Sep 04, 2012 at 09:54PM EDT
Quote

I looked at one of the articles that you linked there (the one about homes being bulldozed) and I saw this wonderfully ill-informed comment:

Why does all the news show the Syria regime at fault? I’m from another part of the world and all I see is everybody trying to comfort the losers. Why does the government have to go down? Just because a radical element stands up to take control, being just another Nazi regime has no ending in violence. The Rebels should be held accountable for this aggression. Assad did not start it and there were no atrocities from the government side before this war. This war is CIA and Mossad inspired. We never see any good talk about Assad. What is the problem with the media? That country had peace before these rebels started their war. Assad should be helped to wipe them out.

I’m thinking; “Boy X would have a lot [of rage] to say to this guy”. He’s asking why the media is being so “one-sided” in favor of the rebels. News flash pal: there is nothing favorable to say about Assad. The media is bashing him because he actually is responsible for the whole mess.

This points out how information on the events are still not widespread.

Sep 04, 2012 at 10:28PM EDT
Quote

So, X, is that video showing some rebels owning a regime tank? I used google translate for the comments, and I can sort of gather that, but I’m not sure.

Sep 04, 2012 at 10:48PM EDT
Quote

X-Singular wrote:

SO let me get this straight:

No troops, so he calls in reserves who are most likely to defect or desert
No munitions, so he uses improvised bombs.
No spare parts, so he uses training aircraft and recon planes as bombers.
Not enough logistic support, so he chooses to bulldoze buildings instead of bombing them.
Not enough money, so he bargains to sell Crude Oil at super-cheap prices.
And then Russia starts thinking like this.

To address the first point, an army mostly based on conscription would have to call in the reserves at one point or another. It is a traditional weakness in this kind of scenario.

And if you’re knocking the L-39 Albatros being used as a light attack aircraft, it is technically designed to do that. All trainer aircraft (Super Galebs, BAE Hawks, Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jets, Yak-130 Mitten…etc) are designed to do light attack duty and against rebels with little anti-air defense, they’re quite effective.

Now I’m not saying that Assad has an advantage but just showing Twins why he might actually win. The rebels have the upper hand for sure but anything can happen at any time, war is unpredictable like that and the regime still has a fighting chance.

Sep 05, 2012 at 01:39AM EDT
Quote

@Sting_auer:
This video shows a Rebel shooting (and possibly damaging) a regime tank.
Owning it? well it shouldn’t be destroyed or wrecked if that’s what you mean.
But it should be damaged.


@Burning_phoneix:
I agree with you that war is unpredictable, but you are forgetting that BOTH our main-attacker planes are variable-geometry wings.
Low speeds are no problem for Su-24 and Su-22. AND the Su-22 can carry 8 times the payload of the Albatross L39 which was SPECIFICALLY manufactured to be a trainer jet.
Yes I’m ripping on the Czech-made airplane, sue me.


@BSoD:
No not rage, I would talk to them and explain calmly, I’ve dealt with people In Real Life who ACTUALLY said on one occasion:“Open fire! No mercy!” when they hear about the death of 6 children died in Ezaz on the hands of the Regime’s airplanes.
I kid you not, some people are this inhuman…
I’m not saying that the Opposition are all Angels or something, yes the have their flaws.
But they were NEVER the ones to start this, this revolution started out peaceful, and for six months peaceful demonstrations were fired at, using live ammunition, by the regime’s forces, and that’s not mentioning the arrests and systematic torture.
The State-run media kept showing us bodies of dead soldiers that it claimed were killed by the “Armed Terrorist Gangs”, and we all heard rumors that those bodies belonged to the soldiers who REFUSE to fire on civilians and are field-executed for insubordination as an example to others.
Back then, there was NO Syrian Free Army. no place for soldiers to defect, you either kill your peaceful countrymen or you get executed.
But after the FSA was formed, all the stories were confirmed…
Refer to my earlier thread, you’d see Videos of massacres committed against innocent civilian Syrians, lots of which were children.
And before you think that things got better, they got a hundred times worse since then, the massacres are still as horrible as ever, but more numerous, I simply refrain from posting them here for the sake of the thread’s viewers.
(Actually I want to ask your opinions on this, should I post the Youtube ID hidden behind a spoiler button that comes after a strict warning like the old thread, or is it better if I don’t do it at all? I just want everyone to have a clear picture of what it means when I say that ### number of people died.)



Cotton factory in Al-Muwasalat Al-Qademah, Aleppo after being bombed

Speaking of that, 230 people died today, 114 of them in Aleppo.
The FSA campaign against the Regime’s air-force continues, with news of another downed Helicopter today
THE VIDEO’S BEGINNING IS BLACK, IT ACTUALLY STARTS ABOUT HALFWAY-IN.


And now for international News.
In an interview with the Turkish Anadol Turkish news network, the Turkish Prime Minister Ardogan said that “My Prayer in the Ummayad Mosque is getting close”.
The Ummayad Mosque is one of the oldest and most famous mosques in Damascus, the implications behind that quote are clear, the point is, does he actually mean it? or is this just more politician talk? My bet is on the latter.
Also the Arab League assembled today, and came up with many decisions, one of which was the immediate taking down of the State-controlled Syrian TV channel from both Nilesat and Arabsat, so that the regime can no longer spread his false propaganda.
Egypt has continued the streak it started in Iran, and is leading the Arab League toward a plan that can get Syria out of this mess, I hope they succeed.



Sign:“From Palestine: Save our brethren in Syria campaign”.
In Ironic news today: Palestinians are sending humanitarian aid to Syrians.
Yes, that is happening.
What has the world come to.


I would like to point out that most of the photos I post are of Aleppo since that is where the biggest battle is going on right now, also I don’t have that much knowledge or connections in other cities, so it’s hard for me to confirm the accuracy of pictures from other cites, whether the location or the date.
It is not because it is actually my city too. I don’t want it to appear that nothing is wrong with Homs or Bo-Kamal or others, Thank you for understanding^

Last edited Sep 05, 2012 at 08:09PM EDT
Sep 05, 2012 at 07:50PM EDT
Quote

(Actually I want to ask your opinions on this, should I post the Youtube ID hidden behind a spoiler button that comes after a strict warning like the old thread, or is it better if I don’t do it at all? I just want everyone to have a clear picture of what it means when I say that ### number of people died.)

I’d post them.


Another thing I noted from my own local news channel yesterday was a report than riots were breaking out in Egypt over the Syrian Embassy.

According to the report, a group of Syrian supporters attempted to replace the Syrian flag at the embassy with the FSA flag. This resulted in a lot of upset Egyptians and both Syrians and Egyptians were throwing fists at each other…I guess that lasted until riot police showed up.

Do you have any details on that event?

Sep 05, 2012 at 10:18PM EDT
Quote

Random Question to X:

Do you think that the FSA would support an Israeli intervention in Syria?

Sep 05, 2012 at 10:31PM EDT
Quote

badsitrep wrote:

Random Question to X:

Do you think that the FSA would support an Israeli intervention in Syria?

Follow-up: Do you even want Israel anywhere near Syria? I ask because the two powers have something of a history with each other.

Sep 05, 2012 at 10:54PM EDT
Quote

badsitrep wrote:

Random Question to X:

Do you think that the FSA would support an Israeli intervention in Syria?

Sep 06, 2012 at 05:02AM EDT
Quote

Blue Screen (of Death) wrote:

(Actually I want to ask your opinions on this, should I post the Youtube ID hidden behind a spoiler button that comes after a strict warning like the old thread, or is it better if I don’t do it at all? I just want everyone to have a clear picture of what it means when I say that ### number of people died.)

I’d post them.


Another thing I noted from my own local news channel yesterday was a report than riots were breaking out in Egypt over the Syrian Embassy.

According to the report, a group of Syrian supporters attempted to replace the Syrian flag at the embassy with the FSA flag. This resulted in a lot of upset Egyptians and both Syrians and Egyptians were throwing fists at each other…I guess that lasted until riot police showed up.

Do you have any details on that event?

Yes I do, the news sites that read are claiming that they were Egyptians who were protesting, and from the videos I watched it was easy to discern the Egyptian Dialect.
The Egyptian Security Forces tried to stop them from breaking into the embassy, because that would be an act of war, and the Egyptians have done it before, about one year ago angry Egyptians stormed the Israeli Embassy, the security forces’ response was a lot smaller, maybe because they weren’t prepared, maybe because no-one likes Israelis. but the point is, now they are prepared.
It’s also worth mentioning that not all Egyptian protesters protested like that, when President Mursi was saying his speech in front of the Arab League, the Egyptians out side were peacefully protesting:

Picture of an Egyptian demonstrator holding a Rebel Syrian flag in one hand, a Bible and a Quran
in the other (signifying the unity of the Syrian people of all sects and religions).


badsitrep, THE KING OF SPACE wrote:

Random Question to X:
Do you think that the FSA would support an Israeli intervention in Syria?


UPDATE TIME
If you are impatient just skip to 0:30, also kinda loud shouting

Today, Al-Izaa naighborhood, Aleppo.

And just so I won’t be called Aleppo-biased:

Yesterday, Qarabis neighborhood, Homs.

Today’s Death toll is 130, most of which are in the cities of Aleppo, Damascus, Bo-Kamal and other eastern cities.
Not included in that number is the death of 61 Syrian refugee-seekers, half of them children, by drowning after the overloaded ferry they took to flee to Turkey hit a rock formation, and crashed in the process taking down it’s 130 passengers with it a short way away from the Turkish shore.


In international news, the UK and France in a joint meeting agreed that efforts must be made to hasten the end of this conflict, while Russian president Putin stated that he sees no reason for him to change his opinion, and that it’s the rest of the world that should reconsider.

Also the campaign that activists started to free Syrian Cinematic Director Orwa Nairabyia (who was arrested by the regime’s forces about a week ago) has made its rounds around the internet, from the Venice Cinema Festival to Robert De Niro himself:




What some people see as rubble, is what others see as their homeland.



Last edited Sep 06, 2012 at 07:10PM EDT
Sep 06, 2012 at 07:00PM EDT
Quote

Simple question: What are the plausible outcomes for Assad?

My current impression of the situation is that, as soon as he is no longer in power, he is facing the same outcomes as Muammar Gaddafi or Saddam Hussein.
Given that, the rational behavior is to keep fighting to the bitter end – no matter what the cost.
He will fight like this so long as there is even a remote chance that he will regain control – as soon as the prospect of remaining in power is wholly beyond reach, the gloves come off, as it is now a matter of fighting for his life.

Those in the regime obviously fear reprisal, so they are afraid of what will happen to them and their families if the regime falls. Their desperation is to protect themselves and their families (what atrocities would you commit to save your daughter from the horrors that await her at the hands of the angry mob that lurks in your nightmares?).

Even if the general populous doesn’t inflict reprisals on those who support the regime, just how fervently do you think the FSA will be in risking their own lives to protect them? Even if the majority do not seek revenge, some will, and who will protect the victims of the lynch mob?

Then, of course, there is the fear of sectarian violence and the massacre of Alawites (and other minorities). Certainly not all in the FSA are interested in turning it into religious/ethnic cleansing, but all it takes is one small group keen on massacre (and at least one has already made pronouncements of such intent). Would the different factions within the FSA actually turn on each other in bloody warfare for the sake of protecting those they were just killing themselves?

We are back to the Syrian government and its forces fighting to prevent the massacre of their families. Those soldiers are taking advantage of possessing heavy weapons now, instead of waiting to be unarmed before the massacre begins in earnest. I do not think it reasonable to tell someone “stop fighting and lay down your arms today so we can more easily slaughter your people tomorrow”.

At this point it looks like a case of not being able to stop what has begun.
The fighting cannot end unless all parties see a reasonable way out, or everyone is dead.
And what about this situation is reasonable?

Sep 08, 2012 at 03:16PM EDT
Quote

Plucked, have you ever heard of the term “The Good Germans”?

“It is a saying among our troops that there are no real Nazis in Germany, only “good Germans.” Every crime Germany committed against humanity seems to have been done by someone else.”

Last edited Sep 09, 2012 at 10:14AM EDT
Sep 09, 2012 at 10:11AM EDT
Quote

burning_phoneix wrote:

Plucked, have you ever heard of the term “The Good Germans”?

“It is a saying among our troops that there are no real Nazis in Germany, only “good Germans.” Every crime Germany committed against humanity seems to have been done by someone else.”

I never claimed government forces were divine paragons of virtue – it is likewise ridiculous to portray all government forces as bloodthirsty monsters whose only purpose in life is to slaughter babies while laughing maniacally. Government forces and opposition forces are both comprised of people – it isn’t angles vs demons, it is people vs people. Both sides are human with human motivations, human desires, human fears, human loves – to claim otherwise is intellectually dishonest and a rationalization either for your view that it is perfectly acceptable to slaughter them or as a way to convince yourself that you could never do anything bad because you are a ‘good’ person, unlike them. We are all just people.

I did not make any assertions of blamelessness (atrocities are committed by people on both sides – that is the reality of war), just that I do not see a plausible way to end hostilities in the current situation. Saying that a course of action is rational is not the same as saying it is morally good and righteous.

If you want the conflict to end, you have to offer combatants an acceptable alternative.
Right now, today, what is the alternative? Government forces quite rationally fear reprisals if not outright sectarian massacre when they lay down their arms and surrender to the Syrian National Council (or whatever quasi-governmental group wants to claim power).

Horrible things have been done, horrible things will continue to be done (by both sides) – that is the reality of the situation.

What I’m asking is, quite simply, what is the alternative? So long as the government and their forces face death for themselves (and likely their families) – why should they meekly lay down their arms to be executed instead of fighting for their survival? They don’t have to be paragons of virtue to be rationally self-interested in preserving their own lives (actually a lack of virtue quite strongly reinforces the self-interest in preserving their own lives).

People call for Assad to step down, but why should he?

One possibility would be some country to offer a no-strings-attached asylum for government officials and military commanders. If they could just stop the war, I would see that as an unmitigated good. People will cry for blood, and likely make scapegoats of whatever government employees they can get their hands on, and the sectarian massacre of the Alawites would begin in earnest, fueled by the frustration of not being able to lynch Assad. The prospect of leaving one’s homeland and abandoning their people to be massacred is not an easy choice (ironically, if Assad was the heartless bloodthirsty tyrant people claim he is today, this would be more likely to be a viable option).

Another (unlikely) possibility would be for all parties to agree to a democratic process with UN peacekeeping forces to remain for a few years to ensure there isn’t serious sectarian conflict (because that has worked so well in Iraq and Afghanistan).

Of course, the cynical side of me says the most likely course is a long bloody civil war. Outside parties funding/supplying their favored sides, factions forming and breaking apart, and all the while the general populous gets caught in the middle of the power struggles.

Sep 09, 2012 at 12:36PM EDT
Quote

plucked does bring up some good points. However, it rather seems like he is an apologist for Assad’s regime and the SAF. I would argue that he is attempting to play the victims off as the (potential) aggressors. This kind of reminds me of the debates in this thread; just as some users expressed displeasure in the perceived bigotry of LGBT rights crusaders towards Christians, in the same way, I see some people are afraid that the FSA will turn into the aggressors if the SAF lays down their arms. While I think that some FSA soldiers may exact some revenge on SAF troops, I don’t think that there’s any real danger of them turning the tables and actually persecuting and massacring Alawites or something. I’ll defer to X-Singular for a more informed opinion on this, but those are my three cents.

Sep 09, 2012 at 04:21PM EDT
Quote

I don’t get the feeling that Plucked is being an apologist. He’s just being pessimistic.
Realistically, anyone assuming they can personally predict what would happen in Syria should Assad immediately step down is overestimating their own abilities.

Sectarian violence may or may not arise. However, the regime will certainly continue to use massive violence to keep the populace from asserting their rights. Possibility < Certainty. Assad has refused to use diplomacy on multiple occasions, agreeing to things and not enforcing them. Essentially, the best hope for Syria at this point is his removal from power.

Sep 09, 2012 at 04:38PM EDT
Quote

I am not saying that ALL government forces are bloodthirsty monsters.
But when you consider that that the rebel-forces are basically the government-forces that got fed up with carrying out the orders of massacres and turned on their superiors, then it shows that the ones that DID want to stop the massacres had a way of doing so, a choice was always present, and will always be, defection is always a possibility, and if you don’t feel like endangering your life again, then desertion is the choice for you.
What you are talking about is the standard diffusion of responsibility found in all hierarchical systems, you think all those defected soldiers from the Rebel soldiers are completely clean-handed and never spilled Syrian blood before opening their eyes and defecting?
Of course not, the difference is, they are trying to make up for it, they have families too, and while we haven’t seen the massacres you predict yet (Neither in Syria nor in Libya after the fall of Qaddafi), we have seen and continue to daily see a lot of massacres committed daily by the Syrian regime.
Every evidence points that the rebel’s families will be killed once they lay down their weapons and surrender.


I can’t help but feel that Opspe is right in his assumption, while you might not be an Assad-supporter, your arguments come across as something an Assad-apologist would say.

Namely your equation of the Victim and the Executioner.
You need to read more about the Arab Spring to understand.

The revolution did not start by an armed challenge of freedom-fighters against the stable government, it began by kids scribbling graffiti on the walls in the city of Daraa.

Said kids were held prisoners, beaten and tortured, and the one responsible for these unfair acts against under-aged kids was never prosecuted or punished.

Later, demonstrations started from the public anger regarding this injustice, yet no action was taken to punish the one responsible.

The reason: he is a close relative of the President and he belongs to the Alawite sect that the president belongs to, so by virtue of his sect alone he avoided being reprimanded for a terrible and heinous act.


After that, Assad’s forces took to just firing live rounds, sniping and bombarding innocent peaceful demonstrators, back then there was no Free Syrian Army, no Rebels, no anything, just angered people who sought justice.

For six months this unabashed show of violence continued unopposed by anyone, we kept hearing about casualties in the military, which the state TV claimed where done by the violent rebels, turns out anyone that refuses to fire on and kill his own people is executed on the spot, and later the blame of his death would go to the (then non-existent) armed rebels.
After enough honest soldiers defected, and the FSA was formed, we started hearing the stories of what the regime would do to their own troops should they disobey, and yet the defections continue, putting their own lives at risk, so that they wouldn’t endanger the lives of their countrymen, whom are mostly strangers to them.
If those are not outright the “good” people in this conflict, that it’s the closet you can get to actual “good” people.

as you can see from my tale: The Regime started the violence, not against peaceful demonstrators, but against 12 year old children.

One Civil war later (and 30,000 dead civilians later), you look back and think:
Was it really worth it? Was the insurance of superiority of one sect worth all this death and destruction on all the others (who are the blatant majority)?
Wouldn’t it have been better, if Assad himself was LESS sectarian and just rebuked the guilty party/parties?
The sectarianism was not started by the rebels, it was started by the regime.

Now you might say that the poor soldiers didn’t know what they were getting into.
Ever heard of the Hama Massacre? It happened in Syria by the hands of the Assad Regime, it sounds like no other massacre the regime has committed (Dariya, Howla), except for two major differences:
1. It happened 30 years ago, on the orders of another Assad, the father of the current one.
2. The number of victims is close to 40,000 dead civilians.

When you know you are following the orders of the regime who did those things years ago, and shows every sign of wanting to repeat that feat, and when you see that this and this (LINK WARNING: BLOOD, both pics were taken on 5 September) is the result of your “chosen path”, and that there is another path that tens of thousand of your comrades have taken before you, and yet you continue obeying those orders.
Then I believe that makes you a bad person, a criminal, maybe a monster even, and you deserve some form of punishment for the atrocities that you committed and/or the ones you are still committing.
Those victims had families too you know…


To abridge that last paragraph:
In Civil Law, Resisting Arrest adds to the crime, not justifies it.
Not stopping massacring your own people for the sake of avoiding being punished is not an excuse, just as much as not stopping to the cops out of fear of being imprisoned is not an excuse.


Believe me, Qaddafi used the same arguments you are using right now, and so did his son: “If I’m gone, then the country will plunge into violence”, Libya consists of different warring tribes, and yet when the Oppressive regime of Qaddafi fell, none of you predicted massacres happened.
Those that kept fighting were neutralized, and those that dropped their guns walked free.

Yes, some prejudices might remain, but remember this is the oppressed majority of 40 years, these wounds take time to heal.

But would it plunge into sectarian massacres? I doubt it, the entirety of the Syrian people are exhausted, everyone just wishes for this nightmare to end.

Even if things got to the worst possible point and Al-Qaeda intervened and started sectarian unrest, Sunnis form 85% of the Syrian population, while Shiite,Druze,Kurds,Christians and Alawites combined form the remaining 15%.
So no, the situation will NEVER be like Iraq.


As for prosecuting Assad: everyone would like that, to bring the person responsible to justice, but for now the main goal is to oust him from power.
And you mentioned scapegoats… well when a Brigadier general, your prime minister and your Vice-president defects and flees, that means that a choice is present.
Might I remind you that those that got to those positions didn’t get there because of their skills, merely because of their loyalty and/or their participation in the Baath party, the same party that brought so much ruination on Syrians.
Those that defected are trying to make up for their previous mistakes, or maybe just switching to the winning side, sure the latter might seem cowardly, but it’s preferable than just sticking by the butcher as he carries on with killing his own people.


One point I do agree with however.
Assad is a heartless bloodthirsty tyrant, just not Bashar, the Assad I’m talking about is his father: Hafez.
To put it this way, Bashar has in all the months of conflict, killed less than his father in one day.
The Current Assad is simply a greedy clueless kid trying to live up to his father’s name, he should not have listened to his father’s old officers and solved this problem with gentleness and care.


As for the conflict being long…
I surely hope you are wrong, and both sides are showing clear signs of fatigue, namely the improvised munitions used by the regime.
Also Russia is showing signs of fatigue, while Iran is downright bankrupt, Iran won’t pay any salaries for the next three months, the sanctions and the draining support of the Syrian regime is costing them greatly.

If you read the earlier posts I made on this thread, you’d see I mentioned that the uprising is costing Bashar 1 billion Euros monthly, Iran can’t stomach that price for long.


I haven’t updated in a while, but some breaking news is forcing me too, currently 3 million people are facing a humanitarian crisis…
Aleppo’s main waterline was bombed by the Regime’s airplanes, breaking it, and leaving 75% of
all Aleppo’s neighborhoods without water, and flooding others.

Those people are currently counting on water bottles to sustain themselves, bu eventually those will run out.

Water is unable to be delivered to them from the neighborhoods with water, nor are they able to leave their neighborhoods for the districts that do have water because of snipers and the fact that every moving object is a legitimate target to the Regime’s gunships.

Several news sources (BBC, CNN, Arabiya, France 24) confirm that the water-line damage was caused at the same time an air-raid happened on a residential block near the line.
Not unexpectedly, the Regime blames the rebels of blowing the water-line, but I don’t believe any one would ever be so stupid as to (literally) bog-down his strategic advantage.
It would be in the regime’s favor to flush the rebels out of hiding.

And for the sake of tradition: 172 dead civilians today.

Last edited Sep 09, 2012 at 07:11PM EDT
Sep 09, 2012 at 07:01PM EDT
Quote


Homs, yesterday.

Ahhh September, children go back to their schools:


and the interns go back to the hospitals:



Via Lens of a Young Homsi’s Facebook page:

After many communications with external entities regarding the condition of the cat in Homs, which had been injured by a mortar shrapnel in her back, here is the cat. The cat had been cared for by a member of the Free Syrian Army, who had taken it in his house. The cat’s condition is very stable after it was treated by one of the field hospitals in Homs, until it recovered from the injury. Thank Goodness, the cat is now walking on all four legs , the care the cat received from the staff of the field hospital, and the young man who had taken it in and cared for it in his house. We apologize for previously mistakenly diagnosing the cat’s condition as having been paralyzed in its back legs, as this diagnosis was made by volunteers in the field hospital who did not have the medical experience, particularly with animals. It later became apparent that the cat was not paralyzed after it started walking on all legs, and it seems that the shrapnel that had been in the cat’s back was affecting the nerves, which made it seem as if it was paralyzed, until the shrapnel was removed .

The revolution in both it’s civil uprising and armed combat branches are active

It seems that Aleppo is and will be under FSA’s control for a long time.
It’s worth mentioning that the FSA have changed their official name to National Syrian Army, since they control more than half of Syria, they can’t be called “Free” anymore, they deal with everything from border visas to traffic control, all while fighting off Assad’s forces.
They might want to get a name that represents a governmental responsibility, but it seems that the FSA name is sticking… might take a while for us all to get used to.



in other news, UN envoy and worldwide-famous actress Angelina Jolie has been making trips to check on the conditions of Syrian refugees everywhere, from Lebanon to Jordan to Iraq.
Thank you Ms. Jolie, we won’t forget your kindness.


“I want to say how much I admire your courage. Tell your families and friends back home that the pope has not forgotten you. Tell those around you that the pope is saddened by your sufferings and your grief.”

- Pope Benedict XVI on the Syrian revolution.
Your support is always appreciated, Your Holiness.


As always: 130 dead today, most of which are in Jabal-al-zawieh.
It seems that we will continue to set records, burning_phoneix

Last edited Sep 15, 2012 at 08:51PM EDT
Sep 15, 2012 at 08:45PM EDT
Quote

Bout fucking time:

Iran has confirmed for the first time that forces from its revolutionary guards corps (IRGC) are in Syria helping Bashar al-Assad’s government crush rebels, and warned that it would get involved militarily if its Arab ally came under attack.

Well at least you had the dignity to fess up Iran…wait..what?

In a clear public signal of Tehran’s continuing support for Assad, the commander of the Islamic republic’s elite military formation said that a number of members of the IRGC’s Qods force were in Syria, though General Mohammad Ali Jafari gave no further details and claimed this did not constitute “a military presence”.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/sep/16/iran-middleeast

Sep 16, 2012 at 09:55PM EDT
Quote

burning_phoneix wrote:

Bout fucking time:

Iran has confirmed for the first time that forces from its revolutionary guards corps (IRGC) are in Syria helping Bashar al-Assad’s government crush rebels, and warned that it would get involved militarily if its Arab ally came under attack.

Well at least you had the dignity to fess up Iran…wait..what?

In a clear public signal of Tehran’s continuing support for Assad, the commander of the Islamic republic’s elite military formation said that a number of members of the IRGC’s Qods force were in Syria, though General Mohammad Ali Jafari gave no further details and claimed this did not constitute “a military presence”.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/sep/16/iran-middleeast

This just in:

Tehran sucks at lying.

Sep 16, 2012 at 10:10PM EDT
Quote

badsitrep wrote:

This just in:

Tehran sucks at lying.

This just in, nothing’s changed and Iran is still full of dicks.

Actually, this could work to the rebels’ benefit – no one wants to be the host of a proxy war, but if Bashar is Iran’s friend then he’s Israel’s enemy. Iranian troops are likely to deter pretty much everyone else, but it could potentially drum up some more Israeli support for the FSA, which is something I’d like to see.

This does raise the usual issue. Normally, I’m live-and-let-live on Iran’s nuclear program, but it’d be much too risky to allow them to have nukes if Syria turns into a battleground, and I don’t want the US to feel obligated to help Israel stop Iran’s nuclear program. As much as I would like the US to get involved in Syria, I don’t want us involved in Iran.

So that’s my foreign policy for the day.

Last edited Sep 16, 2012 at 10:45PM EDT
Sep 16, 2012 at 10:44PM EDT
Quote

ExudesAffluence wrote:

This just in, nothing’s changed and Iran is still full of dicks.

Actually, this could work to the rebels’ benefit – no one wants to be the host of a proxy war, but if Bashar is Iran’s friend then he’s Israel’s enemy. Iranian troops are likely to deter pretty much everyone else, but it could potentially drum up some more Israeli support for the FSA, which is something I’d like to see.

This does raise the usual issue. Normally, I’m live-and-let-live on Iran’s nuclear program, but it’d be much too risky to allow them to have nukes if Syria turns into a battleground, and I don’t want the US to feel obligated to help Israel stop Iran’s nuclear program. As much as I would like the US to get involved in Syria, I don’t want us involved in Iran.

So that’s my foreign policy for the day.

The moment the FSA gets Israeli support is the moment they lose the war.

Sep 17, 2012 at 08:18AM EDT
Quote

burning_phoneix wrote:

The moment the FSA gets Israeli support is the moment they lose the war.

^THIS

The moment the FSA gets Israeli support is the moment they lose Syrian support.

Sep 17, 2012 at 10:14AM EDT
Quote

Several notable developments:

Free Syrian Army moves their command center from Turkey to within Syria

A video posted on YouTube appeared to show the leader of the FSA, Riad al-Asaad, confirming the move.

Gen Asaad does not say in the video when the move took place, or where in Syria the FSA’s new headquarters are.

The video which appears to show Gen Asaad announcing the move is entitled Communique Number One From The Inside.

In it, he says that the relocation had happened “after successful arrangements the FSA made earlier in collaboration with the combat battalions and brigades to secure liberated areas”.

He goes on to say the FSA will fight “side by side” with “all brigades and factions” until victory.

Gen Asaad adds the capital, Damascus, will be “liberated soon, God willing” but also rejects the idea that the FSA is seeking to replace the current regime.

The Syrian people must agree on any new government, he says.

This is pretty significant on multiple accounts:

1. The FSA head honchos were being criticized for watching the war in the relative safety of Turkey while their men were being killed in Syria. This should put them closer to the fight, especially with the SAF having total Air Superiority.

2. Being away from Turkey moves them away from all the agents of every power in the region. They’re still dependent on Turkey as a route for weapons and soldiers but at least they have some independence now.

3. No matter how good communication technology is, being closer to the frontline means faster decisions. Also, the closer commanders are to the fight, the better their soldiers fight.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-19686938


In other news, Bashar Al Assad made some remarks to an Egyptian weekly:

President Bashar al-Assad of Syria has been quoted by an Egyptian magazine as saying the Arab uprisings only brought chaos and the Syrian rebels cannot win.

He insisted his government would not fall like that of Muammar Gaddafi in Libya and that dialogue was the “only solution”, al-Ahram al-Arabi reported.

The weekly said Mr Assad had given it an interview, but Syrian officials said he had been speaking informally.

Mubarak said he wouldn’t fall like Ben Ali in Tunisia. Gaddafi said he wouldn’t fall like Mubarak and now Bashar is saying he won’t fall like Gaddaffi. I’m sensing a pattern.

Also, this has nothing to do with the events in Syria but he was talking about Qatar and Saudi Arabia:

Our correspondent says the president was also bitterly scathing about the role of Saudi Arabia and Qatar in supporting the opposition.

“Those have suddenly become wealthy after very long period of poverty,” Mr Assad said. “They imagine they can use their wealth to buy the geography, history and a regional role.”

He might have a point with Qatar which only became independent in 1971 but….

Saudi Arabia establishment 23 September 1932
Oil Fields discovered 1938
Oil field development 1941
Syrian Independence from France 17 April 1946

You know…the Independence your Grandfather didn’t want to happen.

Seriously Bashar, we were rolling in oil since before the Republic :/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-19671635

Last edited Sep 23, 2012 at 08:56AM EDT
Sep 23, 2012 at 08:55AM EDT
Quote
The Syrian Regime is not responsible for the bombing of the Syrian cities, the terrorists are the ones responsible.

Terrorists, ladies and gentlemen:

This gem (and a lot of other ones of the same value) was spoken during a recent interview of Syrian Deputy Foreign Minister Faisal Mekdad on BBC. Go watch it here, just try not too rage too hard, lying is what this regime’s best at.

For example, the same Mekdad said that Syria is being targeted by the Zionist state since Syria is the last country that stands in the face of their ambitions….
Care to explain this leaked document by a defected intelligence officer?

Translated:


General Command of the Armed Forces
Air Force – air defense management
Air Intelligence 291
Special Tasks

(Mission Order)

To : Sohail Hassan – Rank: Colonel – Grade: …
To go to: of section 291 in time: 9 Date: 3/4/2011 m
To the Israeli-Syrian border using as a vehicle for transport: civilian cars
Mission: securing the Israeli-Syrian border on the {…} and surrounding areas, in cooperation with the State of Israel – Return: as soon as the end of his mission.

    Brigadier General
     Seal and signature
……

The red seal on the top says “Urgent – Top Secret”
Oh c’mon guys, why are you keeping secrets from us? I thought we were closer than that.
Some “resistance” you are….

This document and tons other that were also leaked show just how truthful they are in their intentions.


Still about 130 civilians dead daily….

Last edited Sep 25, 2012 at 07:53AM EDT
Sep 25, 2012 at 07:52AM EDT
Quote

Ten bets Bashar Al Asshead says the bomber is dropping bread baskets.

I’m fucking calling it right now.

“We are not dropping bombs and killing thousands of innocent civilians. We are dropping bread baskets.

And it just so happens that these bread baskets explode and contain zero grain-based food."

Sep 25, 2012 at 09:24AM EDT
Quote

Either that or they will claim they are dropping humanitarian aid in the form of heavy explosives. Because the beleaguered citizens need to use heavy explosives in order to clear out the rubble they live in.

Sep 25, 2012 at 09:40AM EDT
Quote

Burning_phoneix wrote:

>Some random European military dude
>Not FSA.

I am disappoint.
Are you implying that the FSA don’t know how to form a proper D&D party?
Of course they have a bard:

Skill: Inspire +1 to all roles.
Pic via Reuters.

I mean, you don’t expect us to fall behind the Libyans, do you?

Sep 25, 2012 at 01:53PM EDT
Quote

Because, dear Quantum…You can destroy a mans home, his neighbors home, his job, his family and his friends…but you can never destroy a mans taste for acoustic talent

Sep 27, 2012 at 11:54AM EDT
Quote

Blue Screen (of Death) wrote:

Because, dear Quantum…You can destroy a mans home, his neighbors home, his job, his family and his friends…but you can never destroy a mans taste for acoustic talent

Good poi-… wait a sec, you missed your ‘u’ in ‘Neighbour’.

Yes, I’m THAT sad that I noticed such a thing.

Sep 27, 2012 at 12:05PM EDT
Quote

The quoted post has been deleted.

I know they’re both correct, I just assumed he’d type it with a u. Duh.

But this is irrelevant!

Sep 27, 2012 at 12:13PM EDT
Quote

@Quantum

Americans don’t use the U, remember?

I tend to use US English on this forum for the sake of our American viewers. But lets not get off topic

Sep 27, 2012 at 12:17PM EDT
Quote

量子 Meme wrote:

May I ask why he’s brought that guitar into combat?

If Fire Emblem has taught me anything, it’s that having someone next to you playing some music makes you do everything twice as fast.

What’s that? Your AK-47’s Rate of Fire is 600 rounds per minute? WATCH AS MY ACOUSTIC RENDITION OF “WE WILL ROCK YOUMAKES YOUR AK FIRE 1200 ROUNDS PER MINUTE THROUGH THE POWER OF MUSIC!

Last edited Sep 27, 2012 at 01:04PM EDT
Sep 27, 2012 at 01:04PM EDT
Quote

burning_phoneix wrote:

If Fire Emblem has taught me anything, it’s that having someone next to you playing some music makes you do everything twice as fast.

What’s that? Your AK-47’s Rate of Fire is 600 rounds per minute? WATCH AS MY ACOUSTIC RENDITION OF “WE WILL ROCK YOUMAKES YOUR AK FIRE 1200 ROUNDS PER MINUTE THROUGH THE POWER OF MUSIC!

I would like to see a BF3 video of that happening.

(Mod idea detected)

Sep 27, 2012 at 03:04PM EDT
Quote

Several developments in Syria, all pretty major:

Aleppo’s Silk Road souk burns to ashes in battle for Syrian city

Large parts of Aleppo’s covered market, the largest of its kind in the world and a Unesco world heritage site that traces its history back to the 14th century, have been reduced to ashes as government forces and rebels fight for control of the city.

I’m sure X-Singular can tell us more about this Souk but what used to be this:

Is now this:

Guardian Article:


Syria bomb blast kills Hezbollah operative

One of Hezbollah’s most senior operatives has been killed in Syria and buried in his home village in Lebanon’s Bekaa valley, the militant group has confirmed.

Ali Hussein Nassif, a founding member of the organisation, was killed near Homs over the weekend in what is believed to have been a roadside bomb explosion. A Lebanese government official confirmed on Tuesday that his body had been transferred from Syria through the Masnaa border crossing.

The fact that Hezbollah are admitting to this is pretty surprising, they’ve always denied being in Syria.

The issue of Hezbollah members fighting in Syria has remained deeply sensitive since the earliest days of the uprising. For most of the past 18 months, the Shia Islamic group had steadfastly denied that its members were in action alongside Syrian forces, despite emphatic claims from rebel groups and opposition figures.

While openly acknowledging the party’s support for the embattled regime of Syria’s Bashar al-Assad, Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah had claimed it had only leant moral backing. However, new graves in cemetaries in Lebanon designtated for members deemed to have died as martyrs have steadily been dug throughout the summer. There has also been reported discontent among family members who had lost relatives.

Guardian Article

And there war widens still.


Turkey’s parliament authorises military operations against Syria

Turkey’s parliament has authorised military operations against Syria and its military has fired into the county for a second day after shelling killed five civilians in a Turkish border town.

For its part, Syria admitted it was responsible for the shelling and formally apologised for the deaths, a top Turkish official said.

This is not quite the mandate required for war, just some skirmishes on the border. Turkey does not wish to go it alone.

Yet Turkey is still loth to go it alone in Syria, and is anxious for any intervention to have the legitimacy conferred by a UN resolution or the involvement of a broad group of allies. Turkey is mindful in part of inconclusive ground missions, mostly in the 1990s, against Kurdish guerrillas based in northern Iraq, as well as the bitter lessons of being seen as an occupying power that are associated with the US-led invasion in Iraq.

Reaching deeper into history, Turkey is aware of Middle Eastern sensibilities over Ottoman rule over much of the region.

Guardian Link

Last edited Oct 04, 2012 at 11:57AM EDT
Oct 04, 2012 at 11:55AM EDT
Quote

@Turkey manning the fuck up and giving Assad the Italian Victory Salute

Please let Turkey win and Assad get sent to a Turkish prison….
Please let Assad get sent to a Turkish prison….
I so desperately want to see Assad talking about how he learned not to drop the soap….

Oct 04, 2012 at 12:48PM EDT
Quote

@Burning_Phoneix:

Officially apologized?

Think again.

Do you really think that they will apologize?
Remember the shot down Turkish jet? the one we mentioned Last thread?
The bodies of the two pilots were later found, and it was assumed that they were dead when they crashed.


But that is not what happened.
According to leaked documents from defected top intelligence officers what happened is that the Syrian Regime arrested the two pilots from the crash-site, detained them, and received a direct order to kill them, so they murdered them by “drowning” them near the crash site, and made it look like they died on impact.


Yes, you shoot an airplane flying over international waters, and then you drown its crew after their rescue, and pretend that nothing happened.
Then you March into Lebanese villages and torch them, then you fire mortars at the Turkish Villages, killing five civilians including a mother and her three sons and wounding 9 others, and FINALLY, you deny that you ever apologized, and deny that you ever will.

Ladies and gentlemen, now you know why I’ve almost given up on updating this thread, when you commit ALL THESE TRANSGRESSIONS against your people AND the international community, and nothing is done to stop you, then it’s clear they they don’t want to stop you, nor will they ever do.


My City:

And its people:


569 Days of continuous uprising.
50,000 Dead civilians and counting. (according to Syrian activists within the country)
500,000 Missing. (same source)
1,500,000 Displaced from their homes.
2,500,000 Wounded and/or in need of humanitarian aid.
2,945,000 Destroyed buildings.
1,000,000,000 Euros spent monthly by the Syrian government to fight the uprising.
10,000,000,000 US Dollars sent by Iran to Assad to help him quell the revolution.

Kill as much as you want Mr President, destroy as much as you want, no one will stop you, there was a million chances, but they didn’t and they won’t.


_____________________ The world is your b*tch





Last edited Oct 04, 2012 at 04:21PM EDT
Oct 04, 2012 at 04:05PM EDT
Quote

Assad could use himself a swift and severe ass-kickin’ if you ask me.

Oct 04, 2012 at 08:38PM EDT
Quote

Never give up, X. As Assad does not, neither should you. I say keep updating and remind people that it isn’t over.

If I was a national leader, the least I would do is put pressure on the UN to aid the FSA, pressure Iran to stop squandering all their money to support a regime that’s doing nothing useful with it and pressure Syria’s neighbors to provide more support for refugees, and if possible: action against the regime.

Sadly, I couldn’t just send my nations troops right over to Syria to kick some ass. There’s a thing about spending your nations resources on another nation that you have no involvement in. That sort of thing doesn’t pass through parliament.

Nations like Turkey are more poised to take action. They are directly nearby and there is a good chance they will get dragged into Assads mess. When that happens Turkey will bitch slap Assad. I doubt Turkey will tolerate any more of their civilians being shelled. We can hope for that at least.

Oct 04, 2012 at 10:28PM EDT
Quote

Lots of updates. So let’s go through them:

Turkey responds to Syrian mortar fire in Akcakale

Turkish artillery has returned fire on Syria for a fifth day after a mortar landed in a border village.

Five people were killed in a similar incident, reportedly in the same street in the village, Akcakale, last week.

Turkey has been firing daily into Syria since Wednesday’s deaths, as apparently stray munitions fall on its territory.

The article is a bit dated (October 7th) and artillery fire has still been going on.

BBC Article


‘Saudi weapons’ seen at Syria rebel base

BBC News has uncovered evidence that weapons intended for the Saudi military have been diverted to Syrian rebels.

Three crates from an arms manufacturer – addressed to Saudi Arabia – have been seen in a base being used by rebel fighters in the city of Aleppo.

How the small crates reached Aleppo is unknown, and the BBC was not allowed to film their contents. Saudi Arabia has refused to comment on the matter.

Saudi Arabia’s response:

From what we can see from the crate’s manufacturer. It seems to be simply 7.62 WP ammo. (Which the AK-47 uses)

BBC Article


Ankara deploys F-16 fighter jets to southeastern border

Turkey has confirmed it is deploying more fighter jets to an airbase close to the border with Syria, amid artillery exchanges along its tense southeastern border with Syria.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey’s prime minister, addressed parliament on the issue on Tuesday, saying that his country does not want war, but that Turkey needs to be prepared for anything.

At least 25 additional F-16 fighter jets were deployed at Turkey’s Diyarbakir air base late on Monday.

Meanwhile, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the NATO secretary-general, said that Ankara can rely on the alliance, which has “all necessary plans in place to protect and defend Turkey if necessary”.

Rasmussen warned against the dangers of the conflict in Syria escalating, saying alliance member Turkey had shown commendable restraint in response to the shelling of its border area.

Al Jazeera Article


Syrian Plane carried Radar- Not Weapons says Russia

Russia says the Syria-bound plane intercepted by Turkey amid reports it was carrying cargo which could aid government war efforts was transporting a legal shipment of radar equipment.

“There were no weapons on the plane,” said Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.

His comments followed heated exchanges between Turkey and Syria over the exact nature of the items confiscated.

Turkey’s PM earlier said Russian-made defence equipment was found on board – a claim Syria dismissed as a lie.

Damascus has challenged the Turks to put the seized goods on public view.

Could the Turks just trying to drum up support for a war, or were there truly weapons? Most defense experts say that the radars are most likely for Anti aircraft missile systems, of which Syria has a huge stockpile of.

BBC Article

Speaking of Anti air missiles…


Rebels seize goverment Air Base

The headline is a bit misleading. They captured an Air defense base not an airbase…but that’s still good going.

Syrian rebels have captured an air defence base east of Aleppo as government forces battled fighters on several fronts across the country, activists say.

The air defence base seized by the rebels was located in al-Tana village by the Koris military airport on the road east from Aleppo to al-Raqqa, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said on Friday.

Clashes were also taking place at a military barracks close to Maarat al-Nuaman, a town on the main highway to the
northwestern city of Aleppo, which was seized by rebel forces earlier this week, the Observatory said.

Al Jazeera Article


Rebel groups later released these videos:

That is the S-75 Dvina missile, aka the SA-2 Guideline

The missile……is really really old. To give you some historical perspective… It’s the same missile that shot down U2 Pilot Gary Powers in 1960. Of course, the missile system has been continuously updated since then (with the last update occurring about in 1995) but the Russians have phased out the system already.

Basically, if you get hit by an SA-2 missile in a modern fighter, you are bad and you should feel bad.

However, the Syrian Armed Forces operate a mixture of advanced aircraft (Mig-29M/M2s and Mig-25s) and older aircraft (Mig-21 variants, Mig-23 as wella s Sukhoi-22s and -24s) and as has been noted, even training aircraft like the Albatross so the older SA-2 might still be useful.

That being said…so you see how big that missile is? It’s designed to shoot American bombers up to 60’000 feet in the air…not nimble bombers skimming the ground to hit rebels and cities.

Last edited Oct 12, 2012 at 10:18PM EDT
Oct 12, 2012 at 10:17PM EDT
Quote

Just a reminder, get out and VOTE, get your voice heard, maybe your vote will end this state of spectator-ship the world is having.
Our area had entered a state of coma in the last month as everyone sits down and watches who the new “most powerful man in the world” will be
There was a million chances for Obama to act, but they were all thrown aside in fear of them damaging his campaign
I’m not asking you to vote for either candidates, just VOTE, any state of action is preferable to this silent nightmare.

We are fighting for the right to do what you are expected to do today.
Don’t waste it.

Last edited Nov 06, 2012 at 04:48PM EST
Nov 06, 2012 at 04:43PM EST
Quote

Frankly I think the chances of US taking action are equally low with both presidents, both of them are and will be reluctant to spend their waning money on any nation that is not the US

But I suspect the chances will be even lower with Romney. He may be planning on boosting the US military but knowing republicans, that’s just to tighten defenses. He’s shown less concern for Syria than Obama so far.

But even if Obama cares more; his intention to take money out of the military shows that he’s not seeking a military solution.

I’d wager that if Syria wants to encourage more international aid, it might be best to focus on getting the support of nearby neighbors

Last edited Nov 06, 2012 at 07:33PM EST
Nov 06, 2012 at 07:32PM EST
Quote

Blue Screen (of Death) wrote:

Frankly I think the chances of US taking action are equally low with both presidents, both of them are and will be reluctant to spend their waning money on any nation that is not the US

But I suspect the chances will be even lower with Romney. He may be planning on boosting the US military but knowing republicans, that’s just to tighten defenses. He’s shown less concern for Syria than Obama so far.

But even if Obama cares more; his intention to take money out of the military shows that he’s not seeking a military solution.

I’d wager that if Syria wants to encourage more international aid, it might be best to focus on getting the support of nearby neighbors

Actually, Romney said it out front that he wants to arm the Syrian Opposition, and that killing Assad would be a great moment in history, and would help bolster stability in the region.
As a great friend put it: “Assad is his Osama”
Obama is all for the passive aid route, sanctions that hurt the people as much as (if not more than) the regime.

Last edited Nov 06, 2012 at 08:04PM EST
Nov 06, 2012 at 07:49PM EST
Quote

X wrote:

Actually, Romney said it out front that he wants to arm the Syrian Opposition, and that killing Assad would be a great moment in history, and would help bolster stability in the region.
As a great friend put it: “Assad is his Osama”
Obama is all for the passive aid route, sanctions that hurt the people as much as (if not more than) the regime.

It’s ironic because Romney also argued against supporting the Libyan rebels and has openly stated his intention to start a war with Iran.

Nov 06, 2012 at 07:59PM EST
Quote

@X

Oh? Perhaps I misjudged him then.

I remember the subject of Syria being brought up during the presidential debate. It’s on both of their minds. Neither one likes Assad. I remember that they both agreed he needed to go and wanted to do something about it.

However I don’t recall either of them making statements that they would seriously commit to direct conflict with Assad

Romney is right though; if he takes out Assad it would make a hero of him in very much the same way that the removal of Osama put Obama in a stronger light. It would certainly be a moment in history.

I criticized Romney for wanting to put more taxpayer money into military efforts when that money could have gone towards the development of the nations economy and education system instead. However if Romney can use that budget increase for the military to take out Assad. It will be entirely worth it.

Last edited Nov 06, 2012 at 10:13PM EST
Nov 06, 2012 at 10:08PM EST
Quote

No offence but the massive increase in spending of the military is completely unnecessary which Mitt Romney purposed by 2 trillion over the next decade, the army has not asked for additional funds to maintain the standing army as it is, which is 600 billion dollars a year, increasing the total to 800 billion per year. To be honest, this whole conflict has been an issue right form the gecko and might not improve over time as Turkey is dragged into this issue, and the possibility of Syria turning into a state of political chaos like Somalia. The only countries making progress to solve this conundrum is China and Russia, probably the only major world powers which will intervene in this issue.

Nov 06, 2012 at 10:51PM EST
Quote

O HAI! You must login or signup first!