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KYM book club general.

Last posted Oct 27, 2012 at 06:10PM EDT. Added Oct 10, 2012 at 10:50PM EDT
34 posts from 23 users

I’m a huge fan of the Magical Realist style, by authors like Márquez and Borges. I also really like Flannery O’Connor.

One problem with a lot of the magical realist works is that a lot of the humour doesn’t translate from the original Spanish. That’s why I enjoyed reading One Hundred Years of Solitude in Spanish (Cien años de soledad)…it was a lot funnier.

Oct 10, 2012 at 10:58PM EDT
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If you haven’t read A Song of Ice and Fire, you should, because it is neat.

Oct 10, 2012 at 11:26PM EDT

FIRST RULE ABOUT FIGHT CLUB

TALK ABOUT BOOK CLUB

Don’t know why but I like this book. About girls. On the internet.

Oct 11, 2012 at 12:11AM EDT
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I love books and writings about The Occult, horror, and logical analyses of human life and actions. H.P Lovecraft, Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Henry David Thoreau…so many fantastic writers.

Oct 11, 2012 at 12:49AM EDT
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Anyone else here read the Arsene Lupin books? Great stuff. Imagine the opposite of Sherlock Holmes, the Gentleman Thief. They were actually written at about the same time, the author of the Lupin books being French. In fact, he even outsmarts “Herlock Sholmes” in one story.

Oct 11, 2012 at 01:06AM EDT
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Currently reading 1984, and it’s amazing. I don’t know why I’m always impressed by the books I read, since I nearly always read classics, but it’s still awesome. I’m also reading V for Vendetta, which is also incredible. After that I’m thinking of picking up the novelization of Bioshock (Yeah, I think I have a thing for dystopian literature) and the novelization of Ico as well.

Oct 11, 2012 at 01:06AM EDT
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Orson scott Card,

best sci fi author of ALL TIME

Daniel Keyes – Flowers for algernon

All of Chuck Palahniuk’s works

Oct 11, 2012 at 01:21AM EDT
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@Kim Jong

> Orson Card
> Best Sci-Fi


“You must be new here.”

Lol, just joking around.
I loved Ender’s Game. I haven’t read anything else by him though.

Last edited Oct 11, 2012 at 01:42AM EDT
Oct 11, 2012 at 01:40AM EDT
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I just had to read Of Mice And Men for a class. ’Twas meh. Though I am currently trying to remake The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air theme song using the events of the story from the perspective of Lennie.
Childhood faves include Holes, Frindle, No Talking and Lunch Money. I liked Andrew Clements, alright?

Oct 11, 2012 at 07:33AM EDT
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Wikipedia is my gaint web-book of knowledge, look it up once in a while.

Oct 11, 2012 at 12:40PM EDT
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Stephen FUCKING King

I started with Misery, then Cell ,Carrie, Pet Sematary, The Green Mile, Buick 8,Firestarter and now currently reading Thinner
Gotta love how he describes EVERYTHING and EVERYONE

Oct 11, 2012 at 12:58PM EDT
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It’s weird – many of the books I like are books that I was forced to read for a school project. Case in point: Fahrenheit 451. It’s a really nice read; it manages to convey great imagery (albeit with some odd euphemisms, like beetles for cars) and it’s really good at creating suspense.

Also, I definitely recommend “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. It’s basically a collection of Vietnam war stories, and it’s a good read. I’ll warn you, however; it does have some strong language.

Oct 11, 2012 at 08:13PM EDT

William Schnell wrote:

It’s weird – many of the books I like are books that I was forced to read for a school project. Case in point: Fahrenheit 451. It’s a really nice read; it manages to convey great imagery (albeit with some odd euphemisms, like beetles for cars) and it’s really good at creating suspense.

Also, I definitely recommend “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. It’s basically a collection of Vietnam war stories, and it’s a good read. I’ll warn you, however; it does have some strong language.

This. Fahrenheit 451 was amazing.

And I don’t know what you’re meh’ing about with Of Mice and Men, it’s ending is probably one of the most heart-rending things I’ve ever read.

Oct 11, 2012 at 08:27PM EDT
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Pseudogenesis wrote:

This. Fahrenheit 451 was amazing.

And I don’t know what you’re meh’ing about with Of Mice and Men, it’s ending is probably one of the most heart-rending things I’ve ever read.

Alright, points for the powerful ending. Though I feel like it was all LOK-y. Intense ending, slightly boring everything else. And then we had to watch the John Malkovich version of the movie and by GOD, did they mess up the ending. Lennie was in mid-sentence and then BAM!! Shoulda’ just stuck with the book ending.

Oct 11, 2012 at 11:09PM EDT
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Double Spark wrote:

Stephen FUCKING King

I started with Misery, then Cell ,Carrie, Pet Sematary, The Green Mile, Buick 8,Firestarter and now currently reading Thinner
Gotta love how he describes EVERYTHING and EVERYONE

Be sure to read Dolores Claiborne as well. He opts for a more realistic horror situation, as there’s nothing supernatural, but King does a great job of making you hate some of the characters.

Oct 12, 2012 at 12:15AM EDT
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Arlon The Serene (Free Cake) wrote:

Alright, points for the powerful ending. Though I feel like it was all LOK-y. Intense ending, slightly boring everything else. And then we had to watch the John Malkovich version of the movie and by GOD, did they mess up the ending. Lennie was in mid-sentence and then BAM!! Shoulda’ just stuck with the book ending.

Well we watched (and listened through audiobook) to Gary Sinese’s version, so it was pretty much impossible to dislike it. That ending really does sound like it sucks though.

Something that you said, regarding the intense ending but slightly boring everything else, made me think. I’ve played a few games like that, and they ended up becoming my favourite games. Ico was fairly mediocre in gameplay, but its ending singlehandedly convinced me that it was my favourite game of all time. (Until I played Katawa Shoujo, but that’s a different story for a different time.)

Oct 12, 2012 at 12:24AM EDT
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Cale wrote:

First book I ever read, no regrets.

Holy shit this book was beautiful.
Back to the thread. Do fanfictions count as books?

Oct 12, 2012 at 10:40AM EDT
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Big James Patterson and Michael Connelly fan.

Oct 12, 2012 at 02:50PM EDT
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My favorite book

Oct 12, 2012 at 07:04PM EDT

Here’s a curve-ball you probably haven’t heard of, but you should totally read :

A little sample:

“On the field they crash together, some fast shuffling, then the whistle. Number 36 is down, not down flat-on-the-back down. He’s down on his knees like he’s waiting for the executioner’s ax…

. . . Number 36′s back is hunched, his head is tucked down, and his arm swings a little with his breathing. Every little tick of the second hand is measured in pain. I can see that; the clench of the body after each ragged breath, that’s the tell…

A person could never tell from this moment, frozen in the yellow light, that he has a sense of humor. He wrote funny things on the whiteboards in empty classrooms and everyone, teachers and students, pretended we didn’t know who was making us smile. In this moment, he is just a hurt animal, and that’s how I remember him.

But none of that matters now, because that game is totally over and Number 36 is totally dead.

His broken bone healed. It healed stronger than before. He got faster and bigger and stronger, but none of that matters.

Number 36 became Case One."

Oct 12, 2012 at 07:27PM EDT
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Windigo with salad wrote:

Here’s a curve-ball you probably haven’t heard of, but you should totally read :

A little sample:

“On the field they crash together, some fast shuffling, then the whistle. Number 36 is down, not down flat-on-the-back down. He’s down on his knees like he’s waiting for the executioner’s ax…

. . . Number 36′s back is hunched, his head is tucked down, and his arm swings a little with his breathing. Every little tick of the second hand is measured in pain. I can see that; the clench of the body after each ragged breath, that’s the tell…

A person could never tell from this moment, frozen in the yellow light, that he has a sense of humor. He wrote funny things on the whiteboards in empty classrooms and everyone, teachers and students, pretended we didn’t know who was making us smile. In this moment, he is just a hurt animal, and that’s how I remember him.

But none of that matters now, because that game is totally over and Number 36 is totally dead.

His broken bone healed. It healed stronger than before. He got faster and bigger and stronger, but none of that matters.

Number 36 became Case One."

Damn.

That paragraph told more of a story than most books can do in a chapter.

Oct 12, 2012 at 09:01PM EDT
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@Pseudo: I loved 1984 as well. I thought it was a story with powerful commentary and some very, very interesting predictions for the future. A classic in Dystopian realistic fiction.

I like reading a bunch of different things. I like alternate/future history books and current events books. I’m not a massive fan of fantasy, but I do enjoy it every now and then. I like realistic fiction so long as its plot line falls into a set range of topics that appeal to me. I’ll post good books, and maybe just the works of theorists I like, as I think of them.

Just for starters, though, I’d recommend some things by James Gleick. I really thought that some his stuff was pretty thought-provoking, and I dare say, fascinating. Chaos: Making a New Science is notable for having introduced the Butterfly Effect to mainstream political America and having chronicled chaos theory quite well.

Another book I’d recommend is The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood. It’s about the genesis of the current age of information, and is another fantastic read. I’d recommend that if you can find both, please check them out if you like political science literature.

Oct 13, 2012 at 04:25PM EDT
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Pseudogenesis wrote:

Damn.

That paragraph told more of a story than most books can do in a chapter.

Yeah, no kidding. Blythe woolston is a really awesome author. Not to beleaguer the point but:

“Mr. Banacek collects suff about space.
He told us about himself the first day of class.

When he was a kid he watched the Apollo rocket launches on TV- and Star Treck. He told us about how the stuff on Star Trek was so futuristic for the time, like automatic doors. They had to have some guy pull the doors out of the way when they made the show. Now the doors at the grocery store slike back just like the ones like in Star Trek but for real. And those weird little communicators? They made them out of saltshakers. There was no such thing as a cell phone.

We are living in the future. Except space travel didn’t really work out, and the closest thing to an alien is almost invisible traces that might be a fossil of a bacteria found on a meteorite in Antarcica.

The future, not as advertised.

So now Mr. Banacek has an antique orrery and a scraggly gray ponytail and teaches highschool physics…

Once apon a time, Mr. Banacek wanted to go to the moon. Now he’s in a classroom trying to get us to remember things that happened before we were born. He wants us to be amazed by duct tape and ingenuity. Or maybe he just wants to remember when he was amazed."

From this book:

She is really good at character devolopment.

Also there’s this

Last edited Oct 13, 2012 at 05:48PM EDT
Oct 13, 2012 at 05:35PM EDT
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This… is awesome. Thanks. I’ll need to check out one of her books. Could you point me to your favourite?

Oct 13, 2012 at 07:57PM EDT
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I’m in the middle of “A Clockwork Orange” right now, and can’t decide what I think about it. It’s different than any other book I’ve read.

What are your guy’s opinions on the book? I’ll say what I think but I want to hear you guys first. (Don’t talk about the movie please, the books a whole new ballpark)

Btw, to respond to earlier in this thread, Stephan King’s best 3 books in my opinion (I’ve read a lot of them) are 1. The Stand 2. The Shining 3. The Body

Last edited Oct 13, 2012 at 08:09PM EDT
Oct 13, 2012 at 08:05PM EDT
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Windigo with salad wrote:

Here’s a curve-ball you probably haven’t heard of, but you should totally read :

A little sample:

“On the field they crash together, some fast shuffling, then the whistle. Number 36 is down, not down flat-on-the-back down. He’s down on his knees like he’s waiting for the executioner’s ax…

. . . Number 36′s back is hunched, his head is tucked down, and his arm swings a little with his breathing. Every little tick of the second hand is measured in pain. I can see that; the clench of the body after each ragged breath, that’s the tell…

A person could never tell from this moment, frozen in the yellow light, that he has a sense of humor. He wrote funny things on the whiteboards in empty classrooms and everyone, teachers and students, pretended we didn’t know who was making us smile. In this moment, he is just a hurt animal, and that’s how I remember him.

But none of that matters now, because that game is totally over and Number 36 is totally dead.

His broken bone healed. It healed stronger than before. He got faster and bigger and stronger, but none of that matters.

Number 36 became Case One."

Oh wow, I’m gonna have to look for that.

I read pretty much anything fiction and don’t really think I can narrow it down to a favorite author.

Stephen King is a pretty big one. I also really like Dan Brown (Angels & Demons, The DaVinci Code, etc). He just has a way of drawing you in and making you want to know what happens next. I usually end up reading his books in 1-3 sittings.

If you want someone funny, read Christopher Moore. He’s just really whacky and out there but he makes it work.

This is a good one to start with:
Read some here

Oct 14, 2012 at 07:01PM EDT
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I had to read this for a class. More symbolism than you can shake a stick at.

Oct 14, 2012 at 07:20PM EDT
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I loved this book as a kid

Oct 27, 2012 at 06:10PM EDT
Skeletor-sm

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