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KYM Tabletop Collab: "The World of Pokemon"

Last posted Oct 29, 2012 at 10:13PM EDT. Added Oct 29, 2012 at 01:08AM EDT
23 conversations with 5 participants

Alright, so, this is the official thread for the tabletop game, which I have currently named “The World of Pokemon.” It’s a working title at the moment, so if any of you have suggestions for one you’d like more, feel free to suggest them.

Overview

Welcome to The World of Pokemon! You’re about to embark on a fantastic journey, unique to you! Do you want to be a famous trainer throughout the land? Do you want to be the top coordinator in the region? Do you want to be a well respected researcher? Anything you want to be is open to you, in The World of Pokemon!

-Basically, I want this tabletop game to be open to whatever someone wants to do in this world. Obviously, a major part of this game is going to be battling, but I don’t think you should have to aim to be the champion of the region to play this game. This is what I’ve got right now for the set up:

Starting Up

Every player in the session comes up with a goal, before they pick their class. It can be class-specific, such as “I want to be the champion of the Kanto region,” or it can not be, such as “I want to get at least one Pokemon to level 100.” Either way, though, this goal is the drive behind your character’s plot and decisions in events. This is what is going to motivate you while you play the game.

Classes

At this point, you pick a class that best suits your goal. I want goal to come first so that it’s a better motivator; in other words, the class should be a benefit to the goal, not the other way around. These are all the classes I can think of off the top of my head; if you have any suggestions, feel free to suggest. The max character level possible is 10 for each region, so the highest character level possible is 50 (I’m only including the five regions of the main games, excluding the Sevii Islands. If you all want to add more regions, we can discuss it).

-Trainer. A trainer gains levels as a character by two ways, either by collecting gym badges, or, if they’re not challenging gyms, by the average level of their Pokemon. Every level gained allows them to buy more items (REFERENCE: Items), and makes it allows them to trade for higher level Pokemon. This is an either/or situation; if a trainer is challenging gyms, he cannot gain levels from leveling his Pokemon, and vice-versa. Each badge is one level, or each multiple of 5 in regards to average level is one level.

- Researcher. The researcher gains levels as a character by catching Pokemon, as well as by being around a variety of Pokemon in his or her party, or while befriending NPCs with Pokemon. Leveling up as a researcher gives you more access to stats of Pokemon, including breeding stats. Every ten Pokemon a researcher “studies” is one level.

-Coordinator. A coordinator levels up as a character by winning contests of any kind, since contests are dependent on region. A coordinator gains access to more props upon leveling, as well potential for bonuses in contest performances and reputation points that allow for different interactions with NPCs. Each first place ribbon is a level.

Origins

-At this point, each player comes up with a town of origin. Not all towns are available, but many are, including all that have a gym or Pokemon professor. The only impact this has is to effect which Pokemon you start with; for example, the traditional starters of each game are only available to start with in the town you start in in the games (I.E., if you want Bulbasaur, Charmander, or Squirtle, you have to start in Pallet Town). This also effects the path your journey takes (REFERENCE: NPC Levels). Once all players have come up with a town of origin, they must decide which Pokemon they will start with. The Pokemon must be available in said town through special event or in the surrounding wild. Keep in mind when picking a town, however, that your choice will impact what other Pokemon are available to catch as you journey (starting in a mountain region may make it difficult to catch a water Pokemon quickly). There is no event for choosing your first Pokemon, and all Pokemon start at level 5. Once starting Pokemon have been decided, players must decide what town they will start their adventure in. They must all be in the same town, but it can be anywhere in any region. Understand, however, that should any of the player’s goals encompass it, the party must go to every town necessary, no matter how circuitous the path is.

Pokemon

Overview

Pokemon are the strange creatures that inhabit this world. We live with them, we grow with them, and we even battle with them! It is with these creatures that you will embark on your grand adventure. Just make sure that above all else, you love your Pokemon, and treat them as your friends and companions!

-Pokemon in a sense are the weapons and armor of this game, and allow the game to move forward. In general, a player has access to every Pokemon in existence; however, some are rarer than others, and some can only be obtained through special events (for example, you can only catch legendaries by initiating the circumstances for their arrival). Each Pokemon also has a type, either one or two from this list:

- Normal, Water, Fire, Grass, Bug, Flying, Poison, Ground, Rock, Electric, Steel, Dark, Psychic, Ghost, Ice, Fighting, Dragon

Each player can have up to six Pokemon on them at a time, but can have an infinite number recorded in the “PC”.

Statistics

To determine a Pokemon’s base statistics, upon receiving a Pokemon, the player rolls a d10 to determine each stat. The six stats to roll are: attack, defense, special att, special def, speed, and endurance. These stats are recorded, and start off the Pokemon. Hit Points are also rolled for using a d12 for levels 5-13, and a d20 for levels 14+, with one a +1 mod for every level above the minimum (I.E., a level 20 Pokemon caught would have d20 + 6 hit points). A Pokemon’s gender should also be decided with a coin flip, and, should the player want, a roll for shine can be made, with a 20 on a d20 being a successful roll. When a player tries to catch a Pokemon in the wild, the GM rolls these stats.

Leveling

Pokemon level by gaining experience in battle. The amount of experience necessary is determined by [IN DISCUSSION]. Upon leveling, the Pokemon gains one point in all stats.

Moves

A Pokemon can know four moves at any one time. These moves are separated into four categories: A moves, SA moves, S moves, and E moves. A stands for attack, SA stands for special attack, S stands for speed, and E stands for endurance. The different categories determine which stats will be rolled for in combat, for both Pokemon. Moves will also have a single type, which determines type matchup. If a move’s type is the same as one of the types of the Pokemon using it, multiply the damage by 1.5. When it is time for a Pokemon to learn a new move, the player has a choice to replace an old move with a new one, or keep the same move set. There is no opportunity to learn the move again after it has been passed over without a TM.

Evolving

Certain Pokemon can evolve dependent on reaching a specific level, or by meeting certain requirements. While it is the GM’s job to know these requirements, players should strive to educate themselves on when and how evolution occurs. Evolution will not differ from evolution in the video games.

Last edited Oct 29, 2012 at 01:44AM EDT
Oct 29, 2012 at 01:08AM EDT
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I’m going to keep editing the first post, and I’ll probably make an actual website to archive all of this, but I thought I’d get it started for everyone to see.

Oct 29, 2012 at 01:09AM EDT
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I think I have an old Pokemon board game hidden away somewhere. I’ll try and find it to gleam some ideas so I can help with this.

Oct 29, 2012 at 01:22AM EDT
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(Adding combat here due to character limit)

Combat

Many of you will take part in Pokemon battles throughout your adventure! Anyone can battle, and it helps your Pokemon grow, as well as your relationship grow!

Starting a battle

Upon starting a battle, the GM will provide a 10 × 10 grid that represents the battlefield. Each grid is about five feet, which means the battlefield is 250 square feet. On this grid will be markings that the GM has drawn to determine landscape that could effect combat (cliffs, buildings, trees, etc.) Figurines for the Pokemon will be placed in the fifth square of the first row on either side of the grid, to mark the starting point for each Pokemon. The Pokemon with the higher speed stat will go first.

Movement

A Pokemon can move ten squares in a single turn as a free action. If the player chooses to do so, he can roll a d6 to determine a certain number of spaces more a Pokemon can move, but this adds a -2 modifier to the Pokemon’s attack for that turn. Climbing landscape takes an extra space unless the object is taller than 30 feet, in which it takes 2 extra spaces and a successful roll of a d20 (independent of any stats). For every 30 feet, add another square to the distance.

Attacking

A Pokemon can attack at any point in a turn as its standard move. Upon attacking, both Pokemon roll for the stat that the move being used is under; att (A)/spec att (SA)/speed (S)/endurance (E) for the attacking Pokemon and def/spec def/speed/endurance for the defending Pokemon. A moves must be done adjacent to the Pokemon (ex. Doubleslap), SA moves can be done from a distance but must be within range (ex. Water gun), S moves involve moving up to five spaces at no penalty adjacent to the Pokemon and attacking (ex. Quick Attack), and E moves are stat modifiers and can be done from any distance (ex. Growl). Both players roll a d10 and add a modifier of half the appropriate stat for their total. If the attacking Pokemon rolls higher, the attack is successful, and does full damage. If the defending Pokemon wins, the attack is dodged/blocked, and no damage is taken. If the rolls are equal, the attack does half damage. E moves work the same way save for effect: if the attacking Pokemon is successful, the move takes effect for the whole battle; if the defending Pokemon is successful, the move fails; if the rolls tie, the move is successful until the attacking Pokemon’s next turn.

When attacking a Pokemon with a height difference (having climbed up something), a -1 mod is added for every square of distance, for accuracy.

Damage/Hit Points

[BEING DISCUSSED]

Oct 29, 2012 at 01:45AM EDT
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Researching

Researching is by far the simplest of all the classes, only involving spending “an hour” studying up on a Pokemon. However, the circumstances in which a researcher can study a Pokemon are very specific:

-A Pokemon that can be researched must be in the ownership of the player, another player in the party, or a friendly NPC.

-The researcher must receive permission from the owner to research the Pokemon. This can prove tricky, as some NPCs won’t immediately be willing to help the player.

-The player must actually take the time in-game to study the Pokemon. This can only be done if time is available, such as staying in a town, resting, or while another player is completing their own objective.

-A study can’t be done while the party is traveling.

-A researcher can only study one Pokemon at a time.

Coordination

[BEING DISCUSSED]

Travel/Time Lapse

While travel isn’t marked by effect on the party, traveling from town to town takes a quarter of a day for each route. Each event also takes a quarter of a day, such as battles, attempted Pokemon captures, or major plot events. In other words, four of any combination of actions is a full twelve hours. Due to certain requirements, there are four quarters available in the night as well, but a party is required to rest two of the eight quarters to not suffer negative effects. If a party doesn’t rest for a full two quarters each day, they receive a -1 mod to all stats in battle or events for every quarter beyond 6 they don’t rest (-1 for going 7 quarters without rest, -2 for going 8, etc.) The party is free to rest any of the two hours available.

Reward Money

[BEING DISCUSSED]

Items

[BEING DISCUSSED]

Game Master

[BEING DISCUSSED]

Last edited Oct 29, 2012 at 01:59AM EDT
Oct 29, 2012 at 01:59AM EDT
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I realized I left out status effects, so I’ll add that later. Feel free to start discussing and suggesting things.

Oct 29, 2012 at 02:53PM EDT
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Perhaps to make Pokemon vary a bit more, in addition to their dice roll obtained stats, they would receive a 0-5 point boost in every stat, determined by their species. (For example, Mew would have a 3 point boost in each stat, Jolteon would have a 5 point speed boost.) This might be a bit difficult to remember for every Pokemon, but it would add more variety.
For experience/level up, Pokemon should start out with needing 10 exp. to level up at level 1, then require 5 more exp. each subsequent level up. Exp=10+5(Level-1). Legendaries should require double exp. to level up. Pokemon should give xp equal to their level, times 1.25 if it is evolved once, 1.5 if it is evolved twice, and 2 if it is legendary, rounded down.

Last edited Oct 29, 2012 at 05:07PM EDT
Oct 29, 2012 at 05:06PM EDT
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Also, minor events, such as going to the Pokemon Center, don’t take up time. This allows players to shop and heal themselves without a time penalty.

Oct 29, 2012 at 06:38PM EDT
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Status Effects

Certain moves can cause status effects, such as burns, poison, or paralysis. If the status effect is the main focus of the attack, roll for endurance. If the effect is a secondary aspect, the GM rolls a d20 for success.

When a successful roll leads to a status effect, the player whose Pokemon is effected must roll a d4 every turn. Effects of the roll depend on the status effect, but a 4 will always heal a Pokemon.

Burn:
- 4 on a d4: status is healed; Pokemon is no longer effected.

-3 on a d4: Status is still in effect, but no effects this turn.

-2 on a d4: Pokemon gains a -1 mod on speed that lasts until the end of the battle.

-1 on a d4: Pokemon gains a -1 mod on speed that lasts until the end of the battle, and takes 1/10th of their hit points in damage.

Paralysis:
- 4 on a d4: status is healed; Pokemon is no longer effected.

-3 on a d4: Status is still in effect, but no effects this turn.

-2 on a d4: Pokemon gains a -1 mod on speed that lasts until the end of the battle.

-1 on a d4: Pokemon gains a -1 mod on speed that lasts until the end of the battle, and cannot move this turn.

Freeze:
- 4 on a d4: status is healed; Pokemon is no longer effected.

-3 on a d4: Status is still in effect, but no effects this turn.

-2 on a d4: Pokemon gains a -1 mod on special defense that lasts until the end of the battle.

-1 on a d4: Pokemon gains a -1 mod on special defense that lasts until the end of the battle, and cannot move this turn.

Poison:
- 4 on a d4: status is healed; Pokemon is no longer effected.

-3 on a d4: Status is still in effect, but no effects this turn.

-2 on a d4: Pokemon takes 1/10th of their hit points in damage.

-1 on a d4: Pokemon takes 1/10th of their hit points in damage, and gains a -1 mod on special defense that lasts until the end of the battle.

Confusion:
- 4 on a d4: status is healed; Pokemon is no longer effected.

-3 on a d4: Status is still in effect, but no effects this turn.

-2 on a d4: Pokemon gains a -1 mod on all offensive stats for this turn.

-1 on a d4: Pokemon takes 1/10th its hit points in damage.

All statuses can be healed by items as a standard action in battle. Any status that is still present after battle save for confusion will be present until healed.

Oct 29, 2012 at 06:51PM EDT
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Switching Pokemon

As a standard move, a player may switch Pokemon during their turn at any time. They must place their new Pokemon at the starting position after switching, and cannot attack this turn. However, they are free to move.

Oct 29, 2012 at 06:52PM EDT
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*Note: When an S move is used, the Pokemon must move the spaces the player decides before rolls are made to see if the attack is successful.

Oct 29, 2012 at 06:53PM EDT
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I recommend adding “Natures” to the game.

Basicly when you get a pokemon you roll a d6 twice, The frist roll determines which stat the pokemon will level up faster (Exp:I rolled a 1, so my pokemon levels up attack faster) and the second stat represents which stat will level up slower (Exp:I rolled a 5 so speed levels up slower), and if you roll doubles the pokemon won’t level up any stat faster or slower.

But best of all you can use the chart up there to determine the pokemon’s personality (So my Exp Pokemon has a Brave Personality), We may have to add more nature names for the endurance stat but natures can totally work in this game.


Oh and by the way the change of getting a shiny pokemon with a d20 (5%) here is too high, Because the changes of getting a shiny pokemon in the games is 0.0112%.

Last edited Oct 29, 2012 at 07:36PM EDT
Oct 29, 2012 at 07:29PM EDT
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Notsocool the Dewott wrote:

I recommend adding “Natures” to the game.

Basicly when you get a pokemon you roll a d6 twice, The frist roll determines which stat the pokemon will level up faster (Exp:I rolled a 1, so my pokemon levels up attack faster) and the second stat represents which stat will level up slower (Exp:I rolled a 5 so speed levels up slower), and if you roll doubles the pokemon won’t level up any stat faster or slower.

But best of all you can use the chart up there to determine the pokemon’s personality (So my Exp Pokemon has a Brave Personality), We may have to add more nature names for the endurance stat but natures can totally work in this game.


Oh and by the way the change of getting a shiny pokemon with a d20 (5%) here is too high, Because the changes of getting a shiny pokemon in the games is 0.0112%.

That would be helpful; the reason I didn’t add natures to begin with was because I couldn’t think of a good way to incorporate natures into stats. The only thing I’m worried about is a huge gap in stats that would come from that, though I suppose it’s possible to keep that from happening.

As for the shiny roll, it would take far too many rolls to get that kind of chance in shiny. If you’ve got a better idea, feel free to share, but rolling a d20 17 times to find out if your Pokemon is shiny seems superfluous.

Oct 29, 2012 at 07:42PM EDT
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Teh Brawler wrote:

That would be helpful; the reason I didn’t add natures to begin with was because I couldn’t think of a good way to incorporate natures into stats. The only thing I’m worried about is a huge gap in stats that would come from that, though I suppose it’s possible to keep that from happening.

As for the shiny roll, it would take far too many rolls to get that kind of chance in shiny. If you’ve got a better idea, feel free to share, but rolling a d20 17 times to find out if your Pokemon is shiny seems superfluous.

Actually I’m pretty sure the chances of rolling the same number 4 times on a d20 is 8000, We could lower the chances if the player wants but snice shinys don’t change the gameplay we can just leave it optional to the player.

Oct 29, 2012 at 08:15PM EDT
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Eh, four rolls would be OK. I’ll add it to the final manual.

Oct 29, 2012 at 08:17PM EDT
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How will catching wild Pokemon work?

I suggest that the player can use at the beginning of the encounter for a 2/20 chance of capture. This is without damaging the Pokemon.
The player can use attacks to lower the HP of the wild Pokemon, with the risk of knocking it out. Each HP a wild Pokemon loses adds +1 chance of capture.

Using a Pokeball unsuccessfully removes it from your inventory.

Examples:
A wild Lotad appeared! (Let’s give it a base of 18HP for example’s sake)
a)
-Throw Pokeball: Roll d20, on 1 and 2 it will be captured.
b)
-Attack with [move]: Lotad loses [damage of attack] (Depending on roll for amount)
-Lotad has 10HP left.
-Throw Pokeball: Roll d20, on 1 through 10 Latad is captured.
b2)
-Attack again. If you roll too much damage Lotad will faint, so be cautious.

So every attack you do will increase the chance of capture.

Oct 29, 2012 at 08:37PM EDT
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Rolling it twice gives a 1/400 chance, if that is small enough. Also, would shiny provide any sort of bonus?
Perhaps instead of +1 in each stat upon level up, a D4 could be rolled for each, with 1 being no gain, 2 or 3 being +1, and 4 being +2.
Damage could be a simple attack – defense, with 1 damage being dealt if the attack is successful but defense > attack. The actual damage formula is roughly
[(2*level/5)]* Attack *(movepower/foedefense)] * Stab * Effectiveness (from Serebii.net.) .

Last edited Oct 29, 2012 at 08:40PM EDT
Oct 29, 2012 at 08:39PM EDT
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Penz0id wrote:

How will catching wild Pokemon work?

I suggest that the player can use at the beginning of the encounter for a 2/20 chance of capture. This is without damaging the Pokemon.
The player can use attacks to lower the HP of the wild Pokemon, with the risk of knocking it out. Each HP a wild Pokemon loses adds +1 chance of capture.

Using a Pokeball unsuccessfully removes it from your inventory.

Examples:
A wild Lotad appeared! (Let’s give it a base of 18HP for example’s sake)
a)
-Throw Pokeball: Roll d20, on 1 and 2 it will be captured.
b)
-Attack with [move]: Lotad loses [damage of attack] (Depending on roll for amount)
-Lotad has 10HP left.
-Throw Pokeball: Roll d20, on 1 through 10 Latad is captured.
b2)
-Attack again. If you roll too much damage Lotad will faint, so be cautious.

So every attack you do will increase the chance of capture.

I was thinking that battles with wild Pokemon would go the same as trainer battles, but with the GM playing the wild Pokemon. Capture would be based on a successful roll similar to what you just described, but follow this pattern:

-With a Pokeball being 0, each higher ball will add a 2 to the capture roll (2 for great ball, +4 for ultra, etc.) +2 will also be added for special balls if the conditions are met (ex: If the Pokemon is bug or water type, net ball is a +2). Masterball is the obvious exception, being a perfect catch every time.

-Every 5 levels, capture rolls get a natural -1 mod for difficulty ( a lvl 7 rattata is 0, but a lvl 12 is -1).

-Full health is a -4 mod to a capture roll (it’s rather hard to catch a Pokemon with full health). Once the Pokemon has less than full health, the negative mod is removed, and a +1 mod is added for every 1/5th of HP removed.

-Status effects add a +2 to capture rolls.

So, let’s say we set a successful roll of a d20 at 10. If we’re trying to capture a level 17 Butterfree that has a base of 35 HP with a great ball, and the Butterfree is at 20 HP:

-2 for level, +2 for ball, +2 for HP. That means that the roll has a +2 modifier, and that the player needs to roll 8 or better to successfully capture the Butterfree.

These are just my thoughts; feel free to contribute your own. I do like the idea, Penzoid.

Oct 29, 2012 at 09:04PM EDT
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Teh Brawler wrote:

I was thinking that battles with wild Pokemon would go the same as trainer battles, but with the GM playing the wild Pokemon. Capture would be based on a successful roll similar to what you just described, but follow this pattern:

-With a Pokeball being 0, each higher ball will add a 2 to the capture roll (2 for great ball, +4 for ultra, etc.) +2 will also be added for special balls if the conditions are met (ex: If the Pokemon is bug or water type, net ball is a +2). Masterball is the obvious exception, being a perfect catch every time.

-Every 5 levels, capture rolls get a natural -1 mod for difficulty ( a lvl 7 rattata is 0, but a lvl 12 is -1).

-Full health is a -4 mod to a capture roll (it’s rather hard to catch a Pokemon with full health). Once the Pokemon has less than full health, the negative mod is removed, and a +1 mod is added for every 1/5th of HP removed.

-Status effects add a +2 to capture rolls.

So, let’s say we set a successful roll of a d20 at 10. If we’re trying to capture a level 17 Butterfree that has a base of 35 HP with a great ball, and the Butterfree is at 20 HP:

-2 for level, +2 for ball, +2 for HP. That means that the roll has a +2 modifier, and that the player needs to roll 8 or better to successfully capture the Butterfree.

These are just my thoughts; feel free to contribute your own. I do like the idea, Penzoid.

I think your idea is definitely better, using the modifiers for capture chance suits the tabletop concept better than just adding capture rate according to damage taken.

Oct 29, 2012 at 09:09PM EDT
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KI....D wrote:

Perhaps to make Pokemon vary a bit more, in addition to their dice roll obtained stats, they would receive a 0-5 point boost in every stat, determined by their species. (For example, Mew would have a 3 point boost in each stat, Jolteon would have a 5 point speed boost.) This might be a bit difficult to remember for every Pokemon, but it would add more variety.
For experience/level up, Pokemon should start out with needing 10 exp. to level up at level 1, then require 5 more exp. each subsequent level up. Exp=10+5(Level-1). Legendaries should require double exp. to level up. Pokemon should give xp equal to their level, times 1.25 if it is evolved once, 1.5 if it is evolved twice, and 2 if it is legendary, rounded down.

Sorry, forgot I didn’t respond to this. I’m not sure if giving stats to specific species would be necessary, especially if we include natures. I just don’t want to clog up the game with too many stat variables; part of a game’s appeal is accessibility.

The experience idea, however, I really like. It’s really simple, and since battles are going to be less common, it allows leveling to actually occur.

Oct 29, 2012 at 09:12PM EDT
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I have a question about the origin section:

“At this point, each player comes up with a town of origin. Not all towns are available, but many are, including all that have a gym or Pokemon professor. The only impact this has is to effect which Pokemon you start with. […] Once starting Pokemon have been decided, players must decide what town they will start their adventure in.”

So lemme get this straight: I chose a starting town/city, choose a starting Pokemon from that area. Other players also choose their starting town/city. Then the other players and I would begin our journey at a location that is not our home?

Oct 29, 2012 at 09:14PM EDT
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Penz0id wrote:

I have a question about the origin section:

“At this point, each player comes up with a town of origin. Not all towns are available, but many are, including all that have a gym or Pokemon professor. The only impact this has is to effect which Pokemon you start with. […] Once starting Pokemon have been decided, players must decide what town they will start their adventure in.”

So lemme get this straight: I chose a starting town/city, choose a starting Pokemon from that area. Other players also choose their starting town/city. Then the other players and I would begin our journey at a location that is not our home?

That is the gist, yes. You can start in the hometown of one of the players, if you want, but I didn’t want to force that to be the only option. One of my big desires of this game is that it opens up Pokemon to the players in a way that none of the video games can, and part of that is letting them come up with their own story. To me, one of the greatest ways to do this is to open up the beginning of the story, and allow the players to come up with a character that truly represents them, rather than just being an Ash Ketchum pallet swap (see wat I did thar?). Allowing people to create a character in a different town, and with a different starting Pokemon, directly influences their experience, and impacts the party in unique ways. And allowing them to meet and start adventuring in any town they want that’s available changes how they view the game; instead of just being a linear story from a to b, it’s a living, breathing world open to them.

And, just to be clear, I do have a system in mind that allows trainers to always be challenged by gym leaders and trainers. I just haven’t posted it yet.

Last edited Oct 29, 2012 at 09:39PM EDT
Oct 29, 2012 at 09:38PM EDT
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Oh gosh, proximity moves. This is what I’ve whipped up on the fly for them:

Proximity Moves

Proximity moves, such as spikes, are SA moves, but the protocol for them is slightly different. When a proximity move is used, only the attacking Pokemon rolls for stats to see if the attack is successful. If it is, the player picks five spots on the map for the objects of the attack to be placed. Any square can have up to three objects, and these objects cannot be jumped or dodged if a defending Pokemon moves into a space with objects in it. Upon entering a space with spikes or other objects, the defending Pokemon must roll for SD to see if damage is caused.

-One object causes 1/8 HP damage

-Two objects cause 1/6 HP damage

-Three objects cause 1/4 HP damage

Oct 29, 2012 at 10:13PM EDT
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