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Digital Aristole: Thoughts on the Future of Education

Last posted Nov 11, 2012 at 12:39AM EST. Added Nov 10, 2012 at 05:35PM EST
3 posts from 2 users

(Please watch the entire the video before Posting)

ITT:Discussion about how personal digital tutors will effect education today.

Nov 10, 2012 at 05:35PM EST
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I feel obliged to say firstly that I liked the Daft Punk reference.

This is definitely an interesting concept, and I’d like to talk about how I think this will work out in the future, but the ITT was pretty specific, on how I think personal digital tutors will effect education today, so I’ll just stick to that.

I think that, at the risk of stating the obvious, it’s good for children to learn. But everybody learns at a different pace, and something like a Digital Aristotle would help with that. So that’s an upside.

Currently, is there any incentive to fund and support a project like this? Obviously, if we were to get it implemented now, at least in the United States, it would cause more than a little bit of debate. So there would have to be a pretty darn convincing argument as to why we should put time and work into something like this.

Unless I misunderstand the question entirely, because how I’m interpreting it is: Say we’re in the present day. And the prospect of personalized digital tutors comes into play. How would this PROSPECT change things for us? Furthermore, if we do get such an idea implemented, on a national scale at best, how much would things change? If I am misunderstanding the question, please clarify it to me.

I’m not so sure about the economic area of the idea, however. If, in the present day, considering our efforts to get the educational economic system stabilized, could this be good for the teaching industry? How could our teachers compete with things like this? Logically, more people will want to take this alternative if it costs less and seems to have more upsides than downsides. Again, at the risk of stating the obvious, people losing their jobs isn’t a good thing. Schools could capitalize on these types of things by offering to open a market for Digital Aristotle devices, selling them, but that would defeat the purpose of teachers more still.

Again, I’m not sure if I’m understanding the question, thus deflating this entire post. I hope it’s open to interpretation.

I do think it would change things a lot if it were implemented nationwide, at least in the US, which is as large a scale as I can speak on from personal circumstance and experience.

Nov 10, 2012 at 09:55PM EST
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@Avi

This is definitely an interesting concept, and I’d like to talk about how I think this will work out in the future, but the ITT was pretty specific, on how I think personal digital tutors will effect education today, so I’ll just stick to that.

I don’t want to limit the thread to just what it would do right now, Feel free to talk about that and anything as long as it’s related to the topic.

Last edited Nov 11, 2012 at 12:40AM EST
Nov 11, 2012 at 12:39AM EST
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Skeletor-sm

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