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Texas wants to Secede for reals

Last posted Nov 17, 2012 at 06:11PM EST. Added Nov 13, 2012 at 07:26AM EST
43 posts from 26 users

Snap
Crackle
Pop

So how about that. Texas Secession isn’t really a new thing, but this is pretty impressive.

Last edited Nov 13, 2012 at 07:28AM EST
Nov 13, 2012 at 07:26AM EST
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That’s just they found 25,000 people willing to say that. Not all of them were Texans, and it’s not the majority of Texans.
Also, I really hope the internet abuses this service. I really do.

Nov 13, 2012 at 07:40AM EST
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It’s funny because that’s not how secession works. (This is the third site I’ve explained this on, by the way.) Secession is foremost a state movement, and would have to go through the Texas/Alabama/etc. state governments before going through the federal government. Besides, this is just a bunch of butthurt republicans who don’t like that Obama won and shouldn’t be trying to promote secession since they obviously don’t know how to politics. I would assume that even the Republicans in the deep South congresses know that this is stupid and not worth seceding, and eventually fighting, over.

Yes, I suggested this would lead to another civil war if it actually happened. We’ve fought over more legit issues than this; dividing over “I don’t like this guy” is just straight up ridiculous and would make the US look foolish if they just let them go over it.

Nov 13, 2012 at 10:32AM EST
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I blame Russian Fedora; First he leaves us then he leaves America.

But seriously, I don’t find Texas doing that realistic, but hey, who knows?

Nov 13, 2012 at 10:44AM EST
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Well.
At least we don’t have to change the flag when Puerto Rico comes in.

Nov 13, 2012 at 11:09AM EST
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Most of these secession petitions seem to be more symbolic than anything else and, as MDFification pointed out, it was only 25,000 people and doesn’t represent popular opinion in the states these came from.

Nov 13, 2012 at 11:13AM EST
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Kim Jong Is A Feminist wrote:

they’re too obese to withdraw from anything

let alone their power chairs

You mistaking Texas for Mississippi.

Nov 13, 2012 at 12:06PM EST
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>MFW reading the articles.

I’m sorry, but the level of stupidity from people lately has gone off the richter scale. Seriously? Succeeding from the US JUST because we have Obama for four more years? Hey, no one is holding you back from leaving this country. You hate what you go then you’re free to leave. We’re not going to pull apart our country just for individual’s selfish needs.

Last edited Nov 13, 2012 at 12:25PM EST
Nov 13, 2012 at 12:23PM EST
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I would like to point out the fact that Texas was a sovereign republic for ten years before being gladly annexed by the United States. Wikipedia

Nov 13, 2012 at 04:58PM EST
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Texas, please. Leaving the US is surely going to create more problems that it will solve.

Can you guys imagine all the things that could go wrong if they become an independent nation? I’ll start with number 1:

1) Texas extends their border fence around the whole state and not just along the Mexican border

Who wants to post number 2?

Nov 13, 2012 at 07:01PM EST
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Blue Screen (of Death) wrote:

Texas, please. Leaving the US is surely going to create more problems that it will solve.

Can you guys imagine all the things that could go wrong if they become an independent nation? I’ll start with number 1:

1) Texas extends their border fence around the whole state and not just along the Mexican border

Who wants to post number 2?

2) Despite a fence being built on the border, Mexico might leap on the opportunity to retake Texas.

Nov 13, 2012 at 07:11PM EST
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Hey Patrick! What am I now?

Last edited Nov 13, 2012 at 08:16PM EST
Nov 13, 2012 at 07:20PM EST
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Iz y’all talkin’ fo’ rizzle, mah nizzle? ‘cuz I be tizzle on yo frizzle if you tellin’ da trizzle.

Nov 13, 2012 at 07:31PM EST
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Jack Candle wrote:


Hey Patrick! What am I now?

Both Patrick, and I are from Texas…

Nov 13, 2012 at 07:40PM EST
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Jack Candle wrote:


Hey Patrick! What am I now?

Uh… stupid?

Nov 13, 2012 at 10:03PM EST
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@Cale STOP TRYING TO STEAL MY NAME, YOU BIG MEANIE ;-;

This thread is making me laugh way too hard.

Speaking as an actual Texan, I can tell you that quite a few people have actually wanted to leave the US for the longest time, and it’s not because of Obama. And, by the way, don’t think this is a widespread view. I live in a pretty conservative area of Texas (and yes, there actually are liberal areas of Texas like Austin, Houston, most of Dallas, etc.), and most of the people around here think it’s as stupid as I do. If you do the math, at the time of writing, there’s a ratio of 1:277 for people for secession and against, respectively, and some of the signatures aren’t even from Texas- a few other southern states are supporting it (cough and that’s generally the only progressive idea they support, too cough).

When Bush was reelected, we still had inner turmoil due to people wanting to get the hell away from the rest of the States. When Clinton was inducted, there was a push for secession as well. Almost every president has stirred up Texans wanting to separate… Ever since the 1800’s (that Civil War thing- remember…?). Why do they want to separate, though?

Because being in America is quite a bit of a drag.

To better understand them, think of it like this- Texas is a highly nationalistic state, filled with history of rising against oppression (cough usually failing cough), and powerful figures stating that (for some reason or other) Texas is special. A lot of us have this sense of patriotism, but not for our country so much as for our State, causing animosity when an external government imposes upon us.

I know we need the US. I’m not for succeeding. I think it’s a terrible idea. But at the same time, I completely understand their view.

They want to recapture the ten or so years we had as a fledgling nation, the annexation of which, despite what Fridge said, is said to have been far from unanimous (I’ve heard figures such as 1 in 4 were for our annexation, but due to our difficulties as a nation, our Government signed on anyway. Granted, I’ve also heard the exact opposite, that one in four were against annexation, but I’m more inclined to believe the former due to the fact that we had only just began as our own nation, and the reason we fought a revolutionary war was to have our own freedom from another power-hungry nation. It stands to reason we wouldn’t be ripsnorting at the bit to go for another era of being ruled by outside forces).

Nationalism isn’t the only problem either. Think about all the stuff that has been going on in the past year alone- how, under the NDAA, supposedly anyone can be detained without trial for incredibly vague reasons… Or SOPA and PIPA, even. And that’s not all- there’s a couple of internal de jure conflicts as well (though that can be said of almost any state), not to mention the fact that a lot of us feel as though there’s a major misrepresentation of us in politics due to people like Rick Perry himself (because all of us just looooooooove Perry)

This isn’t actually an attack against Obama- Obama’s reelection is really just an excuse… Frankly, it’s a great excuse, because of the anti-liberal sentiment in Texas- and that’s going to help get a lot more signatures. Even so… At the end of the day, no matter who’s in the Oval Office, there’s always going to be a minority who wants Texas to be its own state. To help back up the notion that it’s not just Obama-hate, take the time to reread the petition.

It clearly states:

The US continues to suffer economic difficulties stemming from the federal government’s neglect to reform domestic and foreign spending. The citizens of the US suffer from blatant abuses of their rights such as the NDAA, the TSA, etc. Given that the state of Texas maintains a balanced budget and is the 15th largest economy in the world, it is practically feasible for Texas to withdraw from the union, and to do so would protect it’s citizens’ standard of living and re-secure their rights and liberties in accordance with the original ideas and beliefs of our founding fathers which are no longer being reflected by the federal government.

Those people don’t want to secede because of Obama. They want Big Brother to get their hand off their shoulder and out of their pocket (and, in the case of TSA, off their junk). No matter who president it is, these people will always want more. Frankly, I find it hilarious that so many people on the net have such a strong opinion of the reasons behind it, and that’s normally a resounding “lol Mitt lost- Texas so butthurt”.

TL;DR:
The situation’s like a motherf*cking Transformer- there’s more than meets the eye, yo.

I can feel the downvotes coming- I gave an alternate perspective on it, and now I must pay the price :I

Last edited Nov 14, 2012 at 12:25AM EST
Nov 14, 2012 at 12:19AM EST
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@Patrick

Actually I upvoted you. It’s good to hear the matter from the perspective of an actual Texan.

Thanks for clearing up the motive behind it because just about every source I had on the issue all assumed that the motive was purely the result of the recent elections.

The international community doesn’t really know what’s going on. Most people are finding it safe assume that the secession is a hysterical election reaction because the issue didn’t really become international news until after Obama won his 2nd term but nobody knew that it actually has deeper and older roots than that.

Suffice this all to say, I’ll be very surprised if Texas is allowed to split away from the U.S for reasons I am sure you all know.

Last edited Nov 14, 2012 at 12:48AM EST
Nov 14, 2012 at 12:44AM EST
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Well if you want words from an actual Texan look no farther.
I’m against secesion plain, and dry with extra cheese.
Yeah this isn’t the first time Texas, and secesion were in the same sentance.
I also agree with Patrick.
(From Houston)

Nov 14, 2012 at 12:58AM EST
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Patrick wrote:

@Cale STOP TRYING TO STEAL MY NAME, YOU BIG MEANIE ;-;

This thread is making me laugh way too hard.

Speaking as an actual Texan, I can tell you that quite a few people have actually wanted to leave the US for the longest time, and it’s not because of Obama. And, by the way, don’t think this is a widespread view. I live in a pretty conservative area of Texas (and yes, there actually are liberal areas of Texas like Austin, Houston, most of Dallas, etc.), and most of the people around here think it’s as stupid as I do. If you do the math, at the time of writing, there’s a ratio of 1:277 for people for secession and against, respectively, and some of the signatures aren’t even from Texas- a few other southern states are supporting it (cough and that’s generally the only progressive idea they support, too cough).

When Bush was reelected, we still had inner turmoil due to people wanting to get the hell away from the rest of the States. When Clinton was inducted, there was a push for secession as well. Almost every president has stirred up Texans wanting to separate… Ever since the 1800’s (that Civil War thing- remember…?). Why do they want to separate, though?

Because being in America is quite a bit of a drag.

To better understand them, think of it like this- Texas is a highly nationalistic state, filled with history of rising against oppression (cough usually failing cough), and powerful figures stating that (for some reason or other) Texas is special. A lot of us have this sense of patriotism, but not for our country so much as for our State, causing animosity when an external government imposes upon us.

I know we need the US. I’m not for succeeding. I think it’s a terrible idea. But at the same time, I completely understand their view.

They want to recapture the ten or so years we had as a fledgling nation, the annexation of which, despite what Fridge said, is said to have been far from unanimous (I’ve heard figures such as 1 in 4 were for our annexation, but due to our difficulties as a nation, our Government signed on anyway. Granted, I’ve also heard the exact opposite, that one in four were against annexation, but I’m more inclined to believe the former due to the fact that we had only just began as our own nation, and the reason we fought a revolutionary war was to have our own freedom from another power-hungry nation. It stands to reason we wouldn’t be ripsnorting at the bit to go for another era of being ruled by outside forces).

Nationalism isn’t the only problem either. Think about all the stuff that has been going on in the past year alone- how, under the NDAA, supposedly anyone can be detained without trial for incredibly vague reasons… Or SOPA and PIPA, even. And that’s not all- there’s a couple of internal de jure conflicts as well (though that can be said of almost any state), not to mention the fact that a lot of us feel as though there’s a major misrepresentation of us in politics due to people like Rick Perry himself (because all of us just looooooooove Perry)

This isn’t actually an attack against Obama- Obama’s reelection is really just an excuse… Frankly, it’s a great excuse, because of the anti-liberal sentiment in Texas- and that’s going to help get a lot more signatures. Even so… At the end of the day, no matter who’s in the Oval Office, there’s always going to be a minority who wants Texas to be its own state. To help back up the notion that it’s not just Obama-hate, take the time to reread the petition.

It clearly states:

The US continues to suffer economic difficulties stemming from the federal government’s neglect to reform domestic and foreign spending. The citizens of the US suffer from blatant abuses of their rights such as the NDAA, the TSA, etc. Given that the state of Texas maintains a balanced budget and is the 15th largest economy in the world, it is practically feasible for Texas to withdraw from the union, and to do so would protect it’s citizens’ standard of living and re-secure their rights and liberties in accordance with the original ideas and beliefs of our founding fathers which are no longer being reflected by the federal government.

Those people don’t want to secede because of Obama. They want Big Brother to get their hand off their shoulder and out of their pocket (and, in the case of TSA, off their junk). No matter who president it is, these people will always want more. Frankly, I find it hilarious that so many people on the net have such a strong opinion of the reasons behind it, and that’s normally a resounding “lol Mitt lost- Texas so butthurt”.

TL;DR:
The situation’s like a motherf*cking Transformer- there’s more than meets the eye, yo.

I can feel the downvotes coming- I gave an alternate perspective on it, and now I must pay the price :I

I see no reason to down vote you. Texas isn’t called the “Lone Star State” for nothing, and as you pointed out, there are a lot of reasons people would want to secede from the country.

Last edited Nov 14, 2012 at 01:15AM EST
Nov 14, 2012 at 01:11AM EST
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Blue Screen (of Death) wrote:

@Patrick

Actually I upvoted you. It’s good to hear the matter from the perspective of an actual Texan.

Thanks for clearing up the motive behind it because just about every source I had on the issue all assumed that the motive was purely the result of the recent elections.

The international community doesn’t really know what’s going on. Most people are finding it safe assume that the secession is a hysterical election reaction because the issue didn’t really become international news until after Obama won his 2nd term but nobody knew that it actually has deeper and older roots than that.

Suffice this all to say, I’ll be very surprised if Texas is allowed to split away from the U.S for reasons I am sure you all know.

It’s definitely a logical assumption to make, and I hope I didn’t inadvertently implicate anything by expounding upon the situation from a different perspective. That wasn’t my intention- I merely wanted to clear up a little nebulousness with some firsthand knowledge, ya dig?

I’m usually quite insouciant (maybe even completely apathetic) in regards to politics, but this is far too personal to ignore. I hope and pray we don’t secede.

I also hope that another incident like we had in the 90’s (when the separatist fanatic Rick McLaren had a standoff with DPS officers and the Texas Rangers) never happens again… Although it was a peaceful surrender, I don’t know if we’d be as lucky a second time around. :/

Nov 14, 2012 at 01:17AM EST
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Didn’t they state that some other states would want to secede from the US themselves, too?
My teacher told me during class that apparently a few more states wanted to secede in the same matter and reason.

And that includes California.

Yeah. And this is coming from a Californian, so I’m worried.

(Picture from Wikipedia)
That was a proposal a year back (from Jeff Stone) in creating a South California.
(It was denied by officials, of course.)

As quoted from the article on Wikipedia:
“A 2012 book by Marcus Ruiz Evans entitled California’s Next Century details an overhauling of California’s statehood via a plan to embrace its unique global role and form itself as an independent republic, uniquely poised to become the Switzerland of the 21st century, a global nerve center of international diplomacy, technology and finance.”

Last edited Nov 14, 2012 at 02:03AM EST
Nov 14, 2012 at 02:02AM EST
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The advantages of living on another country.

Nov 14, 2012 at 03:52AM EST

If Texas seceded, then would I retro-actively become a foreigner?

But seriously, there’s always been a minority of Texans who support secession. Right now they’re being particularly vocal about it. For example, my (late) maternal grandfather used to go on about secession whenever national politics and problems came up. Nobody else in the family shared his views on the matter, but there was no point in trying to convince him otherwise, and he’d get over it soon enough. That’s basically a small scale version of what’s going on here. Though this time around, it’s a bit more popular than usual.

p.s. I don’t think Obama’s re-election is the main issue. The articles are implying that it is, but I see no proof.

p.p.s. My paternal grandparents are coming to Oregon for a visit in a few days. I’ll ask them about it.

Last edited Nov 14, 2012 at 04:44AM EST
Nov 14, 2012 at 04:43AM EST
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Patrick wrote:

@Cale STOP TRYING TO STEAL MY NAME, YOU BIG MEANIE ;-;

This thread is making me laugh way too hard.

Speaking as an actual Texan, I can tell you that quite a few people have actually wanted to leave the US for the longest time, and it’s not because of Obama. And, by the way, don’t think this is a widespread view. I live in a pretty conservative area of Texas (and yes, there actually are liberal areas of Texas like Austin, Houston, most of Dallas, etc.), and most of the people around here think it’s as stupid as I do. If you do the math, at the time of writing, there’s a ratio of 1:277 for people for secession and against, respectively, and some of the signatures aren’t even from Texas- a few other southern states are supporting it (cough and that’s generally the only progressive idea they support, too cough).

When Bush was reelected, we still had inner turmoil due to people wanting to get the hell away from the rest of the States. When Clinton was inducted, there was a push for secession as well. Almost every president has stirred up Texans wanting to separate… Ever since the 1800’s (that Civil War thing- remember…?). Why do they want to separate, though?

Because being in America is quite a bit of a drag.

To better understand them, think of it like this- Texas is a highly nationalistic state, filled with history of rising against oppression (cough usually failing cough), and powerful figures stating that (for some reason or other) Texas is special. A lot of us have this sense of patriotism, but not for our country so much as for our State, causing animosity when an external government imposes upon us.

I know we need the US. I’m not for succeeding. I think it’s a terrible idea. But at the same time, I completely understand their view.

They want to recapture the ten or so years we had as a fledgling nation, the annexation of which, despite what Fridge said, is said to have been far from unanimous (I’ve heard figures such as 1 in 4 were for our annexation, but due to our difficulties as a nation, our Government signed on anyway. Granted, I’ve also heard the exact opposite, that one in four were against annexation, but I’m more inclined to believe the former due to the fact that we had only just began as our own nation, and the reason we fought a revolutionary war was to have our own freedom from another power-hungry nation. It stands to reason we wouldn’t be ripsnorting at the bit to go for another era of being ruled by outside forces).

Nationalism isn’t the only problem either. Think about all the stuff that has been going on in the past year alone- how, under the NDAA, supposedly anyone can be detained without trial for incredibly vague reasons… Or SOPA and PIPA, even. And that’s not all- there’s a couple of internal de jure conflicts as well (though that can be said of almost any state), not to mention the fact that a lot of us feel as though there’s a major misrepresentation of us in politics due to people like Rick Perry himself (because all of us just looooooooove Perry)

This isn’t actually an attack against Obama- Obama’s reelection is really just an excuse… Frankly, it’s a great excuse, because of the anti-liberal sentiment in Texas- and that’s going to help get a lot more signatures. Even so… At the end of the day, no matter who’s in the Oval Office, there’s always going to be a minority who wants Texas to be its own state. To help back up the notion that it’s not just Obama-hate, take the time to reread the petition.

It clearly states:

The US continues to suffer economic difficulties stemming from the federal government’s neglect to reform domestic and foreign spending. The citizens of the US suffer from blatant abuses of their rights such as the NDAA, the TSA, etc. Given that the state of Texas maintains a balanced budget and is the 15th largest economy in the world, it is practically feasible for Texas to withdraw from the union, and to do so would protect it’s citizens’ standard of living and re-secure their rights and liberties in accordance with the original ideas and beliefs of our founding fathers which are no longer being reflected by the federal government.

Those people don’t want to secede because of Obama. They want Big Brother to get their hand off their shoulder and out of their pocket (and, in the case of TSA, off their junk). No matter who president it is, these people will always want more. Frankly, I find it hilarious that so many people on the net have such a strong opinion of the reasons behind it, and that’s normally a resounding “lol Mitt lost- Texas so butthurt”.

TL;DR:
The situation’s like a motherf*cking Transformer- there’s more than meets the eye, yo.

I can feel the downvotes coming- I gave an alternate perspective on it, and now I must pay the price :I

I’d hoped people would realize this isn’t a new subject when I pointed that out in the OP, but yeah, Texas and South Carolina have had issues before.

Nov 14, 2012 at 07:38AM EST
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hmmm…

California would be well off if we seceded, we have agriculture, we have ocean access, and we have iron and oil, I believe.

I dunna, it’s just a matter of wait and see, I guess. Texas has a good argument for secession.

Nov 14, 2012 at 10:47AM EST
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@Lone: There’s been talk of splitting Cali since it was made a state, but the Californians were even more stubborn than the Texans. Texas at least split up into parts of Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona, keeping the current borders. California not only wouldn’t split, but negotiated to have the entire Sierra Nevada to become a state.

Besides, like I said, secession ain’t happening, for any state. We’ve fought to keep this country together before, for reasons more deserving of secession than this; we would probably do it again.

Nov 14, 2012 at 11:49AM EST
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Population of texas:

25,674,681 (2011)

Amount of people wanting to secede:

80,000

headdesk

Nov 14, 2012 at 02:37PM EST
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ConnerABacon wrote:

Population of texas:

25,674,681 (2011)

Amount of people wanting to secede:

80,000

headdesk

It’s actually already almost 100,000.

Keep in mind, though, that not all of these signatures are even Texan citizens. Scroll through the names- you’ll see SC, FL, CA, etc. Regardless, as it stands now, there’s like 1/250 people for it, when you consider every signature as Texan. That’s far from a majority, no?

Nov 14, 2012 at 03:11PM EST
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Lone K.K. Slider wrote:

Didn’t they state that some other states would want to secede from the US themselves, too?
My teacher told me during class that apparently a few more states wanted to secede in the same matter and reason.

And that includes California.

Yeah. And this is coming from a Californian, so I’m worried.

(Picture from Wikipedia)
That was a proposal a year back (from Jeff Stone) in creating a South California.
(It was denied by officials, of course.)

As quoted from the article on Wikipedia:
“A 2012 book by Marcus Ruiz Evans entitled California’s Next Century details an overhauling of California’s statehood via a plan to embrace its unique global role and form itself as an independent republic, uniquely poised to become the Switzerland of the 21st century, a global nerve center of international diplomacy, technology and finance.”

Speaking as a Southern Californian, I have not once in the 17.66 years of my life heard anyone even mention secession from the US. I have heard of a proposal to form a new state by dividing California into North and South California, but that the plan was scrapped because there was no agreement on who would maintain possession of the reservoir that supplies all of California’s water. California’s water supply is always pretty low to begin with, so any plans to split it or even give possession to one of the theoretical new states would be out of the question. It’s basically a non-issue.

Nov 14, 2012 at 04:14PM EST
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It didn’t work in the 1860’s, and it sure as Hell isn’t going to work today.

Nov 14, 2012 at 06:18PM EST
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That’s one of the funniest things I’ve seen in ages. Oh, wow…
Honestly, seceding is one of the stupidest things Texans could do. If you really hate Barack Obama and his policies that much, than leave the country yourself. Although history has a way of repeating itself, I doubt any states will be seceding anytime soon.

Nov 14, 2012 at 11:19PM EST
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Patrick wrote:

It’s actually already almost 100,000.

Keep in mind, though, that not all of these signatures are even Texan citizens. Scroll through the names- you’ll see SC, FL, CA, etc. Regardless, as it stands now, there’s like 1/250 people for it, when you consider every signature as Texan. That’s far from a majority, no?

You also have to keep in mind with this that not everyone who agrees signs the petition.

I say they nulify each other, so your 100k is a good estimate. But if I had to give one side an advantage, I’d go with non-signing agreers. Still, far from a general advantage in favor of secession.

Last edited Nov 14, 2012 at 11:32PM EST
Nov 14, 2012 at 11:24PM EST
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RandomMan wrote:

You also have to keep in mind with this that not everyone who agrees signs the petition.

I say they nulify each other, so your 100k is a good estimate. But if I had to give one side an advantage, I’d go with non-signing agreers. Still, far from a general advantage in favor of secession.

Remember, it’s a petition.
But considering the fact that it is at 105k (nearly precise estimate) signatures at the moment, looking at the fact that if it hits 200k signatures, I don’t think passports will be left in the shelves for long.

Nov 15, 2012 at 12:37AM EST
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Lone K.K. Slider wrote:

Remember, it’s a petition.
But considering the fact that it is at 105k (nearly precise estimate) signatures at the moment, looking at the fact that if it hits 200k signatures, I don’t think passports will be left in the shelves for long.

Not really true. 200,000 signatures may seem like a lot on its own, but compared to the population of all the states that have signed the petition and that’s next to nothing.

Nov 15, 2012 at 12:47AM EST
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YNG, The Grey wrote:

Not really true. 200,000 signatures may seem like a lot on its own, but compared to the population of all the states that have signed the petition and that’s next to nothing.

Yeah, I know.
It’s easy to guess this may be a joke due to the obliterating fact that people from other states sign the petition, not just from the state petitioning.

Nov 15, 2012 at 09:56PM EST
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Skeletor-sm

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