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KYM Science General

Last posted Nov 24, 2012 at 02:48AM EST. Added Nov 22, 2012 at 10:00PM EST
18 posts from 12 users

Lone K.K. Slider wrote:

Scientists at NASA claim to have a major discovery to reveal in December 2012.
What is it?
It sounds like life on Mars, or oil, to say the least, on Mars.
WHAT IS THIS?

Curiosity might have found organic material on Mars, they are still sorting through the data that Curiosity’s on board chemistry lab collected so NASA cannot say for certain, that is why they are waiting until December to ensure that this data was not an error.

Last edited Nov 23, 2012 at 11:13AM EST

I’m surprised that there’s an effort to keep this on topic.

Well, I’m impressed.

And I should hope it’s not oil. Life on Mars would be fascinating, even expectable, but I have doubts that it would be anything interesting, of course.

Katie C. wrote:

I’m surprised that there’s an effort to keep this on topic.

Well, I’m impressed.

And I should hope it’s not oil. Life on Mars would be fascinating, even expectable, but I have doubts that it would be anything interesting, of course.

This is a great point. Many members of the general public think of life on Mars as being little green men, so to speak. What Curiosity is actually looking for is remnants, or if it’s exceptionally lucky, live colonies, of much more simple lifeforms: single-celled organisms.

Now, there are a number of methodologies that are being used to try to detect life. Most rely on the analysis of minerals. Here on Earth we have corals, colonies of tiny polyps that use carbonate minerals as an exoskeleton. When coral die, the minerals are left behind. These biogenic carbonate minerals can be spectroscopically distinguished from geologic carbonate minerals such as calcite, because they tend to have microcrystalline structures.

RandomMan wrote:

This thread will become 90% images for the karma.

And 10% actual Science.

It happened to the past threads, it’ll happen to this one.

I agree completely, the last two if I remember correct began with karma whoring science-related images mostly of Bill Nye and Neil degrasse Tyson. THEN everybody got down to business.

Oh, you were wondering when I’m going to post actual science? Later. Someday. BRB.

Dr. Coolface wrote:

Quantum teleportation

Let me run this paper down for you.

  • This paper does not talk about the teleportation of matter as we know it. This paper deals with the transmittion of an excitation state from one ensemble of rubidium atoms to another via an optical fibre.
  • Quantum communication is only possible up to about 200 km. This involves the propagation of quantum states from one end to the other.
  • The teleportation functions by entangling the quantum spin of one of the ensembles to a photon, transmitting that photon to the other ensemble, and then “writing” the quantum spin onto that ensemble.

The researchers used six initial quantum spin states:

│↑〉, │↓〉, │+〉, │−〉, │R〉, │L〉

The original states are orthogonal. They read six output states (ρ1, ρ2, ρ3, ρ4, ρ5, ρ6) with fidelities of >96%. See the figure:

Basically, the future prospects of this are that it might be used in some sort of relay to extend the distance of quantum communications. Since we currently use binary computing, two spin states could easily be used to transmit data ( |↑〉and |↓〉 , for example).

Of course, there are many other considerations that put the applications of technology a long way off. Here are some problems I see:

  • There is no easy way to encode meaningful data.
  • There is no way to transmit sequential data packets without re-“writing” the entire system.
  • Rubidium is expensive.
  • Experimental setup and preparation is also expensive.

It is certainly interesting, though.

Last edited Nov 23, 2012 at 07:30PM EST

Katie C. wrote:

I’m surprised that there’s an effort to keep this on topic.

Well, I’m impressed.

And I should hope it’s not oil. Life on Mars would be fascinating, even expectable, but I have doubts that it would be anything interesting, of course.

I still think Gil Levin’s experiment on Viking back in the 70s proved that there was microbial life on Mars.

And let’s face it, Microbial life is the best we’re gonna get :(

Katie C. wrote:

I’m surprised that there’s an effort to keep this on topic.

Well, I’m impressed.

And I should hope it’s not oil. Life on Mars would be fascinating, even expectable, but I have doubts that it would be anything interesting, of course.

I’m pretty sure that oil settled on ground-level can’t be possible.

If there was a way for the oil to get up that far from Mars’ core, I suggest that we can get to a conclusive statement.
The only way that can happen is by

Skeletor-sm

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