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KYM Webcomics General

Last posted Dec 11, 2012 at 04:50PM EST. Added Dec 08, 2012 at 04:23PM EST
27 posts from 18 users

I speak for myself, but I think this one has discussion value.

So, I was going to make a thread for the discussion of xkcd (one of my favorite webcomics), but I thought to myself that it would likely get locked or auto-lock due to inactivity, because I wasn’t sure if it had enough fans on this site to hold a lengthy discussion.

It occurred to me then that xkcd is itself a member of a larger subculture…WEBCOMICS! Surely, you must be a fan of SOME webcomic, right?

Presenting the Webcomics General thread.

Because KYM can always use another “General” thread. ALWAYS.


Finally, we have a home for all of the misfit webcomics that aren’t Homestuck! Talk about your favorite webcomics, your least favorite webcomics, discuss plot and art aspects of webcomics that you enjoy or don’t enjoy.


Post all of your webcomic-related chatting here! You know you want to!

Just do it.

…Or go wildly off-topic and get it locked! Your choice!

Dec 08, 2012 at 04:23PM EST
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A total of three of my classrooms contain xkcd comics, with one devoting a whole half wall to them. Goes to show the wide variety of topics that xkcd covers.

Dec 08, 2012 at 04:53PM EST
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xkcd has been one of my favorite webcomics since I first started reading it back in about 2008. It’s just such a brilliant strip in its own way, and it covers a wide range of topics so that no matter what your interests are, it’s likely that there’s at least ONE xkcd strip that could appeal to you.


I also really like Cyanide and Happiness, and I still don’t know why. It’s a very anomalous comic, but its simple nature appeals to me somehow.

Dec 08, 2012 at 04:56PM EST
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KI....D wrote:

A total of three of my classrooms contain xkcd comics, with one devoting a whole half wall to them. Goes to show the wide variety of topics that xkcd covers.

Every math and science, and industrial arts classroom in my school has at least one, pertaining to each teacher’s subject
Even my 60-ish year old physics teacher has one


As for a personal favorite:

Last edited Dec 08, 2012 at 05:03PM EST
Dec 08, 2012 at 04:57PM EST
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Adam DeLand wrote:

Random Doom’s the only one I read.

I’ve looked into it, and I think it looks alright. I like Pokemon and think the characters and their traits can be hilarious, but I don’t have the time nor the interest to pursue it.

Dec 08, 2012 at 09:44PM EST
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Webcomics? Oh, let me tell you about webcomics.

I’d say I’m a bit addicted to reading as many as I can remember. In fact, I keep track of more than 50 webcomics and that doesn’t include webcomics that are defunct or completed or are by people from deviantART. Heck, I’ve probably forgotten about 10 or 20 more. Suffice it to say, I love original content of any sort and webcomics are one of the great means of satisfying my lust for optical pleasure.

Now, admittedly, some of these comics probably aren’t that great, but I’m more attracted to a webcomic’s charm. If a webcomic has a specific flavor or feel that makes it stand out from the rest and still finds ways to entertain its audience continuously, I’d read it no matter if the writing is highly predictable or that art style isn’t all the grand.

If I were to suggest webcomics that are still on-going, I’d have to do it in different categories:

If you like silly, action-packed webcomics, I’d suggest the likes of The Adventures of Dr. McNinja, Axe Cop, Girl Genius, Modest Medusa, and Sister Claire.

Bearmageddon and Powerpuff Girls Doujinshi are a little bit more serious than the previous list, but they both have their moments as well. The latter comic is also extremely referential to classic 90’s cartoons so it takes a specific demographic to fully appreciate its content.

If you like silly one-shot comics, I’d suggest the likes of Brawl in the Family (arguably the best video game comic series on the web) and Buttersafe.

If you like entertaining slice-of-life webcomics, I’d suggest the likes of Questionable Content and Sandra and Woo.

And, if you don’t mind reading webcomics with furry characters in them…

If you like lots of drama and engaging story lines, I’d suggest the likes of Bittersweet Candy Bowl, Endtown, Jack (Very NSFW), Lackadaisy Cats, PREQUEL (if you want an amazing substitute for Homestuck, this is the story for you (it’s currently my favorite “comic” even if it’s not in any sort of traditional panel format)), Sabrina Online (one of the first webcomics and a classic), and TwoKinds.

If you want silly webcomics that are good for a laugh, I’d suggest the likes of Housepets!, Precocious (and its subseries, Copper Road), and The Whiteboard.

And finally, a special mention goes to Kevin and Kell for being the oldest, still-active webcomic and for updating absolutely every single day with no days missed since 1995. That is an amazing accomplishment.

Last edited Dec 09, 2012 at 05:53AM EST
Dec 09, 2012 at 05:37AM EST
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inb4tehbrawler/jostinwebcomicologyfight

I suppose the only webcomic I can think of reading is Scandinavia and the World.

I.e:

Last edited Dec 09, 2012 at 06:36AM EST
Dec 09, 2012 at 06:33AM EST
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OOH BOY OH BOY OH BOY OH BOY THIS IS A THREAD I CAN GET INVOLVED IN

I love comics as a medium, and I’ve spent years studying them as an academic field on my own time. However, I really focus on webcomics, as I’m of the firm belief that they are the future of the medium. I love the depth that they can have, the quirkiness of them, and the wide spectrum of options you can choose from.

Webcomics I read currently:

Brawl in the Family. I’ve been a video game fan for awhile now, and I love the silly humor of the strip mixed with Nintendo video game references.

Awkward Zombie. Another gamer comic I read that was one of the first to really give me an idea of what comic theory in webcomics look like. That and it’s just hilarious.

Manly Guys Doing Manly Things. To me, this is probably one of the greatest comics ever written compositionally, because it so smoothly integrates pop culture with real characterization. It may not be a laugh-out-loud strip at times, but it always grabs my attention.

F@nb0y$. Welcome to the first webcomic I ever read. Seriously, this is the strip that got me into webcomics. My old webcomic Sofa Wars had a lot of inspiration from this one, and I still find the strips funny to this day. AND IT’S ALSO ANOTHER GAMER COMIC WUUUUUUUUUT

PREQUEL. This is a semi-fan comic of Homestuck that is set in the universe of Skyrim, and I actually read it before reading Homestuck. It’s silly and D’awwww worthy, and it makes me smile.

MS Paint Adventures. I’M NOT EXPLAINING THIS ONE IF YOU DON’T KNOW IT IT’S YOUR OWN FAULT

Runewriters. This is a small-time fantasy comic that I came upon while randomly surfing teh interwebs. It’s really new, so I don’t have a good judgement of it yet, but it certainly has my attention.

Insert [IMG]. This is a comic about what it’s like to be on the graphic design team of a church, as well as other random quips on Christian culture. I love it; it’s hilarious, and it’s really well-written. Wes Molebash is actually my hero, and has inspired me in a lot of ways.

Webcomics I have read:

VG Cats. It’s incredibly silly, and I usually can find one or two strips that sincerely make me laugh, but I’d be a whole lot more involved in it if it weren’t for the explicitness of the strip. All the sex jokes and swearing, man.

PVP. Never did get all the way through it, but I did put a good three months of my life into it. A great read; it definitely combines gamer culture commentary and a strong plot line very well.

Housepets! This was actually my first forum experience as well as a big part of my internet life. It’s fuzzy (it’s a furry comic, but not so furry to put off non-furries), and it’s really sweet. I lost interest when the plot became overly fantastical, but it’s still a really good read (it’s also the only thing I’ve ever written fanfiction for, which you can find in said comic’s forum if you look hard enough).

One Swoop Fell. It’s now defunct, but this is one of the cutest things I’ve read. I love the art style, and it feels like a children’s book.

TwoKinds. I admit that I’ve read it. I’m not caught up now, but I was for awhile. It’s a really nice story, but you have to be able to get over the furry part, which is laid on a bit thick. Otherwise, though, it’s fun to watch the art develop, and it’s not a bad read.

Hark! A Vagrant. I really enjoy history, so whenever I pop on to the site and read it, I find myself chuckling. It’s a bit obscure for the non-historically inclined, but I think it’s easily understood regardless.

Marry Me. The story of a pop star and a spontaneous marriage, in the classic manga style of storytelling. Really not a bad read, though a bit short, and a bit cheesy. Definitely something for a rainy day.

xkcd. I pop in now and again and read it. It’s a good example of how art isn’t as important in comics as writing is, and because of how big it is, it’s worth following.

You’ll Have That. This was the first strip that Wes Molebash did, and it’s based off of his experiences in his first marriage. It’s a really cute read, and I love slice-of-life stuff, so I’d recommend it.

• Max vs. Max (No longer online). This was Wes’ second strip, which was based off of his experiences as a single guy after going through a divorce. It really spoke about what it’s like to go through the stress of being single after marriage, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Bittersweet Candy Bowl Didn’t really jive with me; it’s a bit depressing. However, it’s certainly a good cover of what it’s like being a teenager, and worth reading.

Questionable Content. Oh, how I tried to like this one. It’s not a bad strip at all, but the constant talk of sex just turned me off (pun intended). It’s a fun read if you like watching art develop, though, and just because it’s not for me doesn’t mean it’s not for everyone.

Spinnerette. This is a perfect example of a comic that puts more emphasis on art than writing, and suffers for it. It pained me to read this, and I use this as the barometer for how bad a webcomic is. The writing is unbelievable and cheesy, and the characters are so one-sided that it’s hard to take seriously. The only reason I’m including it here is because it’s notable enough in my experiences that I can’t NOT include it.

I’ve had countless other endeavors with webcomics, and there are probably some I’m forgetting, but suffice it to say that I’ve read a lot, and I love webcomics.

Last edited Dec 09, 2012 at 04:17PM EST
Dec 09, 2012 at 03:56PM EST
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And then I read Jostin’s post and remembered many more I’ve read.

Axe Cop. This is the silliest and most awesome thing you will ever read.

Sister Claire. I’m not a fan, but once again, that’s just my preference.

Power Puff Girls Doujinshi This is, if nothing else, the biggest nostalgia trip you will ever have if you’re old enough. That being said, don’t expect everything to fit in 90’s CN canon.

Sandra and Woo. It’s changed a bit since I started reading it, but it started very similar to Calvin and Hobbes, and I definitely think it’s cute.

Lackadaisy Cats. Just because I think art in comics is less important than writing doesn’t mean we can’t have both. One of the best comics I’ve ever read, and definitely worth reading.

Precocious. This is about as close to sunday funnies as it gets, and it is awesome for it.

Scandanavia and the World. This was actually introduced to me here on this site. If you like Hetalia, you’ll definitely like this.

• Hiimdaisy (No longer online to my knowledge). Yeah.

Aikonia. Katie, who does Awkward Zombie, does the art for this one. It’s another fantasy comic, and it’s not bad.

Last edited Dec 09, 2012 at 04:15PM EST
Dec 09, 2012 at 04:14PM EST
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If I were to make a list of all the webcomics I’ve read and why I am/am not still reading them, it would take a lot of time and I’d make a lot of people very angry. So I’m going to limit myself to a few of the ones I am currently reading that I like. I really don’t have the patience to list every single one that I like in a single post.

Cucumber Quest is the current comic by the creator of Hiimdaisy. The art style is very cute and as a whole, the comic feels like a love letter to old RPG and adventure games. It’s basically a webcomic version of any of the Mario RPGs.

Battlepug is about a man who forms a special bond with a gigantic pug as he goes on a quest of revenge after losing his mother and village to a gigantic baby seal. It features a lot of wonderfully quirky characters that don’t feel forced and lots of giant versions of cute animals. Also, it’s created by Mike Norton, a name you probably recognize if you’re a fan of superhero comics. Did I mention it won the Eisner Award for Best Digital Comic?

Lackadaisy is one of the few comics I read in high school that I still keep up with today. Amazing writing, amazing art. If you love the Prohibition-era as much as I do, you’ll love Lackadaisy.

Subnormality is not what people usually expect from a webcomic. The comic itself is very text-heavy, especially in later comics, but rather than being a hindrance, it actually enhances the comic and the point that each comic is trying to make. A lot of the comics are just two characters holding a conversation with each other, so the wall of text somehow makes it feel natural due to how Rowentree sets up each panel. Rowentree also makes great use of infinite canvas several times. I may not agree with all the views that Rowentree makes in his comics, but the fact that he still has me coming back and enjoying his work despite his beliefs says something.

Cheap Thrills is an incredibly good slice-of-life comic set in the nineties that just happens to have animals instead of humans. The art hits uncanny valley in early chapters, but the story is what hooked me. The author makes a lot of artistic changes throughout the comic, and you see a great evolution of style as a result. Because it updates sporadically, I tend to go back and reread it again and again.

Gunnerkrigg Court is a comic that blends sci-fi and fantasy incredibly well. It’s about a girl who attends a strange school riddled with magical creatures and wondrous machines. The art is beautiful and the writing is very sold. It’s been running for a long time now.

I’m a fan of David Willis, so Shortpacked and Dumbing of Age are ones which I visit often.

The League of Super Redundant Heroes is probably one of the better comics about superheroes on the internet. It’s not afraid to be ridiculous, which is great, especially considering how ridiculous the superhero genre is in the first place.

Beeserker is about a robot that runs on bees. It’s utterly ridiculous, but that’s what’d you’d expect from a comic where a centaur man turns into a horse when the man-half is cut off.

Last edited Dec 10, 2012 at 07:40AM EST
Dec 09, 2012 at 11:30PM EST
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Surprise Bit wrote:

If I were to make a list of all the webcomics I’ve read and why I am/am not still reading them, it would take a lot of time and I’d make a lot of people very angry. So I’m going to limit myself to a few of the ones I am currently reading that I like. I really don’t have the patience to list every single one that I like in a single post.

Cucumber Quest is the current comic by the creator of Hiimdaisy. The art style is very cute and as a whole, the comic feels like a love letter to old RPG and adventure games. It’s basically a webcomic version of any of the Mario RPGs.

Battlepug is about a man who forms a special bond with a gigantic pug as he goes on a quest of revenge after losing his mother and village to a gigantic baby seal. It features a lot of wonderfully quirky characters that don’t feel forced and lots of giant versions of cute animals. Also, it’s created by Mike Norton, a name you probably recognize if you’re a fan of superhero comics. Did I mention it won the Eisner Award for Best Digital Comic?

Lackadaisy is one of the few comics I read in high school that I still keep up with today. Amazing writing, amazing art. If you love the Prohibition-era as much as I do, you’ll love Lackadaisy.

Subnormality is not what people usually expect from a webcomic. The comic itself is very text-heavy, especially in later comics, but rather than being a hindrance, it actually enhances the comic and the point that each comic is trying to make. A lot of the comics are just two characters holding a conversation with each other, so the wall of text somehow makes it feel natural due to how Rowentree sets up each panel. Rowentree also makes great use of infinite canvas several times. I may not agree with all the views that Rowentree makes in his comics, but the fact that he still has me coming back and enjoying his work despite his beliefs says something.

Cheap Thrills is an incredibly good slice-of-life comic set in the nineties that just happens to have animals instead of humans. The art hits uncanny valley in early chapters, but the story is what hooked me. The author makes a lot of artistic changes throughout the comic, and you see a great evolution of style as a result. Because it updates sporadically, I tend to go back and reread it again and again.

Gunnerkrigg Court is a comic that blends sci-fi and fantasy incredibly well. It’s about a girl who attends a strange school riddled with magical creatures and wondrous machines. The art is beautiful and the writing is very sold. It’s been running for a long time now.

I’m a fan of David Willis, so Shortpacked and Dumbing of Age are ones which I visit often.

The League of Super Redundant Heroes is probably one of the better comics about superheroes on the internet. It’s not afraid to be ridiculous, which is great, especially considering how ridiculous the superhero genre is in the first place.

Beeserker is about a robot that runs on bees. It’s utterly ridiculous, but that’s what’d you’d expect from a comic where a centaur man turns into a horse when the man-half is cut off.

O\\\\\\\O

Cucumber Quest is amazing.

Dec 09, 2012 at 11:35PM EST
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Aw fuck, I messed up a tag and now you’re all missing the rest of my list in that post. Fuck.

Oh well, I’ll just give a list without explanations then.

Subnormality, Cheap Thrills, Multiplex, Dumbing of Age, Shortpacked, The League of Super Redundant Heroes, Beeserker, Gunnerkrigg Court, Oglaf, Battlepug, Lackadaisy, The Abominable Charles Christopher, Allan, Khaos, Best Friends Forever, This Is Not Fiction

I’ll probably explain this shit some other time along with more comics that I like. This just pissed me off.

Dec 10, 2012 at 12:10AM EST
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Surprise Bit wrote:

Aw fuck, I messed up a tag and now you’re all missing the rest of my list in that post. Fuck.

Oh well, I’ll just give a list without explanations then.

Subnormality, Cheap Thrills, Multiplex, Dumbing of Age, Shortpacked, The League of Super Redundant Heroes, Beeserker, Gunnerkrigg Court, Oglaf, Battlepug, Lackadaisy, The Abominable Charles Christopher, Allan, Khaos, Best Friends Forever, This Is Not Fiction

I’ll probably explain this shit some other time along with more comics that I like. This just pissed me off.

The same thing happened to me but I quickly learned that I had just missed a quotation mark in one of the links. If you edit your post and add it in, the entire thing will be fixed and all your info will be intact.

Dec 10, 2012 at 01:46AM EST
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Saved that post for you, Sneaky Bit, but it looks like some was cut off for whatever reason.

Dec 10, 2012 at 07:40AM EST
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I organized my habitual webcomic reads a couple of months ago After you see the size of the list, you will thank me for not reposting it in this thread.

Other comics that I’ve started reading since then:

  • Rusty and Co. – Dungeons and Dragons monsters go adventuring, with multiple laughs per page. It’s one of my new favourites.
  • A Redtail’s Dream – A story comic with excellent art, in which a guy in the far north gets sent on multiple quests and his dog is transformed into a different animal each time.
  • Not A Villain – A hacker tries to be her concept of a hero in a virtual world where hackers are lynched on sight after the real world suffered an apocalypse. The art style has improved from craptastic (with an in-strip subplot about crappy artwork) to passable to suddenly quite good as the author revealed the real world last month.
  • Sins Venials – A comic that pulls out a really good gag every so often
  • Kila Ilo – Cute children investigate cute little aliens who landed on Earth, one of whom is a felon trying to escape her past life. It’s a good mix of silly and serious.
  • Exiern – A soft-core porn comic had a plotline grafted onto it. The operation was a success.
  • Seed – There’s a mysterious girl with magic powers in a medieval realm. You probably know whether or not you like this kind of story.
  • Shades of Gray – The hero is a sex-harassing jerkass, but the worldbuilding is excellent. You don’t see too many webcomics where the non-mammalian females don’t have boobs.
  • Snow by Night – Two thieves trick a powerful magic spirit into assisting their crimes.
Dec 10, 2012 at 10:13PM EST
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Oops, one more.

The Order of the Stick. I need to go back and reread this now that I’ve actually started playing table top games, but I find the humor of this one to be fantastic.

Dec 10, 2012 at 10:25PM EST
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maybe video games DOES cause violence.

Dec 11, 2012 at 04:50PM EST
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