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The Day After Tomorrow.

Last posted Jun 04, 2013 at 02:13PM EDT. Added May 21, 2013 at 02:30AM EDT
13 posts from 9 users

> inb4 omg theres a facebook page like them and all the pictures so they will donate!

May 21, 2013 at 10:57AM EDT

OP, you’ve got a real problem with misdirection.

Titling the thread “The Day After Tomorrow” makes us think you’re going to talk about the consequences of global climate change, while your first link is about the tornadoes in Oklahoma. The title of that link in relation to the title of the thread makes us think the “two miles wide” is a hole in the ozone later, and that it’s somehow affecting families, when we all know the hole is much larger and is above Antarctica.

And then you make the ridiculous assumption that the tornado was caused by global warming. I’ll admit, this isn’t far off, but it’s still ridiculous to interject into the current situation and thi entire thread serves as an example of fearmongering.

May 21, 2013 at 11:11AM EDT
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Straight foward thought time:
Why the fuck is there not a single basement in these schools out there, have they learned nothing?! Also if my house was ever hit by a tornado in OK im gonna be like fuck it keep the rubble im going to new york.

May 21, 2013 at 02:08PM EDT

Ernest Is dead wrote:

Straight foward thought time:
Why the fuck is there not a single basement in these schools out there, have they learned nothing?! Also if my house was ever hit by a tornado in OK im gonna be like fuck it keep the rubble im going to new york.

I lived in the Midwest. We performed tornado drills in school at least once a month, and sometimes more often during the spring and fall simply because that was the period of time when tornadoes were likely to occur. We lined up along the lockers and hallways, crouched toward the reinforced walls, and protected our heads – that’s really all you can do with several hundred people occupying the same space.

That works wonderfully well… if it’s an EF0 – EF3.

EF4s and EF5s are not so nice. They’ll rip apart buildings and depressurize structures with just a glancing blow. Beyond that, even the toughest walls won’t survive 200+ mph (320+ km/h) winds with a direct hit – they’re blown apart, the ceilings collapse, and often the only thing left behind is a pile of rubble and the foundation. The only thing you can do here is hope your home is missed, or be buried into the ground in a reinforced structure.

That brings me to where you talked about basements.. The vast majority of schools don’t have them. They’re extremely expensive, difficult at times to maintain, and often go unused. That’s just for home structures. For schools, they’re even more expensive, and most cities don’t have the funding to build bunker-class buildings. They use brick and cement because that’s what they can afford, and they go just to the point of being up to code. If they want to go beyond that, they have to secure more funding, which requires them to run the gauntlet of just making a request, and even then, they probably won’t get much. Adding a large basement is out of the question – especially on the schools that have multiple floors. They wouldn’t be able to fit all the students down there anyway.


As far as just “moving away”. People like to live where they want to. Yeah, some don’t want to deal with the threat of the occasional tornado strike, just like some people don’t want to deal with hurricanes in the east and in the Gulf, the common annoyances of earthquakes in the west, and the blizzards they deal with in the north. – but they get through it. Disasters happen everywhere, and uprooting your entire life just because there’s the possibility of misfortune doesn’t settle right with most. They have good lives, and do the best that they can. They’ll deal with their issues as they come.


Most of the time I just ignore posts like this. They’re usually made in ignorance of an issue, and I just don’t care enough to say anything. I’m a little bit irate right now though, as I don’t think you’ve ever actually seen bad tornado damage, and just made a wild assumption for hindsight.

Buildings don’t survive bad tornadoes.


Last edited May 21, 2013 at 03:05PM EDT
May 21, 2013 at 02:53PM EDT

Fridge wrote:

OP, you’ve got a real problem with misdirection.

Titling the thread “The Day After Tomorrow” makes us think you’re going to talk about the consequences of global climate change, while your first link is about the tornadoes in Oklahoma. The title of that link in relation to the title of the thread makes us think the “two miles wide” is a hole in the ozone later, and that it’s somehow affecting families, when we all know the hole is much larger and is above Antarctica.

And then you make the ridiculous assumption that the tornado was caused by global warming. I’ll admit, this isn’t far off, but it’s still ridiculous to interject into the current situation and thi entire thread serves as an example of fearmongering.

I am suspecting something is responsible for the strange weather that’s been happening in the last 2-4 years. I mean the entire East Coast was recently hit pretty hard by abnormal weather. Droughts have been increasing. Antarctica is now nearly gone. Donald Trump hates windmills. Something different is happening, and it might be bad. Unless you live in Alaska or some Russian place in Russia.

May 21, 2013 at 09:16PM EDT

I live in Michigan (Which is in the Midwest, and almost every home has a tornado shelter,) I am qualified to tell you to quit your tornado fearmongery.

Last edited May 21, 2013 at 11:40PM EDT
May 21, 2013 at 11:39PM EDT
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Sir Crona Statscowski Esquire wrote:

I live in Michigan (Which is in the Midwest, and almost every home has a tornado shelter,) I am qualified to tell you to quit your tornado fearmongery.

Okay, you’re right, America shouldn’t invade Canada over this.

May 21, 2013 at 11:50PM EDT

Ernest Is dead wrote:

Straight foward thought time:
Why the fuck is there not a single basement in these schools out there, have they learned nothing?! Also if my house was ever hit by a tornado in OK im gonna be like fuck it keep the rubble im going to new york.

Actually, I know a person who was just talking about this.

The water table in most of Oklahoma, and a lot of the Mid-west for that matter, is not too far under the ground. In these cases, it’s difficult, if not impossible (within reason anyway) to build a basement that doesn’t require extreme maintenance and so on.

Another thing is, like someone said, it’s expensive to maintain, and the cost isn’t justified. THis isn’t me speaking, this is the money spent on the school that says it.

Also, so what the last 2-4 years? That’s fucking NOTHING compared to actual geologic and atmospheric phenomena time scales. It’s between multiple decades to millions of years to have any decreeable effect. And the most important thing, wether or not global warming exists or not (it’s still debatable) is how it is actually going. For all we know, the earth may not be reacting to us at all, it might be exactly the same without human intervention. THe other thing is, it may all be self-correcting. We don’t have enough accurate data on it to say for certain, and even then we can’t even predict the weather for tomorrow most of the time correctly. It’s very very difficult to do, and there are an almost endless number of variables involved just day to day, let alone year-over-year, millennia to millennia.

Jun 04, 2013 at 02:14AM EDT
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-22752544

It is happening.

Jun 04, 2013 at 02:17AM EDT

Sir Crona Statscowski Esquire wrote:

>Inb4 this thread becomes “bleeding heart liberal blaming everything on carbon emissions general”

My drink spilled on the carpet. Now, I’m not saying it was carbon emissions, but…

Jun 04, 2013 at 02:30AM EDT
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Skeletor-sm

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