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Stupid Conspire Theorists.

Last posted Jun 11, 2013 at 01:29AM EDT. Added Jun 09, 2013 at 04:59PM EDT
29 posts from 15 users

Here is a brilliant example.

Where are these guys coming from? It seems like they actually are a big demographic sometimes since I’ve met several out spoken ones in my life. Why do they make arguments without evidences or sometimes even an explanation?

Last edited Jun 09, 2013 at 05:00PM EDT
Jun 09, 2013 at 04:59PM EDT

Alex Jones is the funniest guy who wants you to take him seriously. He’s brilliantly nuts.

Jun 09, 2013 at 05:38PM EDT
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Random21 wrote:

Alex Jones is the funniest guy who wants you to take him seriously. He’s brilliantly nuts.

Speaking of Alex Jones, here’s one of this favourites. Obama’s tornado machine

Jun 09, 2013 at 06:15PM EDT
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There are some conspiracy theories that I’m at least somewhat inclined to see where the person believing the conspiracy is coming from, but most of the time I just think they’re dumb and often times incredibly insulting.

Also, this cracked article is an amusing and interesting read. It just goes to show that a lot of conspiracy theories are caused by someone’s different (and often skewed) perspective on an event.

Jun 09, 2013 at 10:21PM EDT
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There are literally countless people on the internet who believe that the Illuminati exists, has manipulated the entire course of history since the 17th Century, worships Satan, is super secret, and broadcasts its existence constantly through hidden messages in music videos and cartoons.

Jun 09, 2013 at 10:44PM EDT
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Dr. Coolface wrote:

Before we go any further… are you one of them?

Depends on the evidence.

Jun 09, 2013 at 11:06PM EDT

There are some conspiracy theories where I lend a bit of credence. EG: Was Julian Assange framed by the governments that were upset over Wikileaks? Hmm, possibly.

But for the most part, pretty much all conspiracy theories are so ludicrous that my immediate reaction to the word “conspiracy” is to scoff at it.

And when people go around spouting their theories as absolutely true without an inkling of doubt as if the burden of proof is on everyone else to disprove, that’s when I pull out my phone and start dialing 1-800-BULLSHIT

You see, just about 99% of the time you hear conspiracy theories, it started because someone got bored and decided that the best way to achieve fame and make themselves feel important is to blow whistles and stir fear and distrust. It works.

Making conspiracy theories makes you feel special whether it has any base in reality or not. It makes you feel even more special if you believe it yourself and convince yourself that you found something awesome and breathtaking that only you know and were smart enough to figure out. You feel even more special if you get people to believe it.

Truth be damned. It’s all about the theorist’s giant throbbing ego.

Ah, I wish I could find the article that NewScientist published that explained the psychology of conspiracy theorists and how it’s not how we are pawns of tyrannical supervillain coverups but how the theorist themselves are pawns of their own paranoia and desire to be heard. That’s why these people seem to be everywhere. Some people just love attention (don’t we all?)

As for all you conspiracy theorists out there, remember: You are an investigator at best and a deluded fool at worst but you are certainly not, and will never be a messiah. Don’t act like one. And if you are going to make a claim, always remember the burden of proof is on you

For those who believe conspiracies: If you find one side of the story hard to believe, show your exact same cynicism about the other side as well. Otherwise you become a hypocrite, calling other people “blind followers” when you do the same thing without question. In fact, don’t call people sheeple at all. It just tells us you are a gullible moron with no capability of independent thought. We know you don’t have all the facts straight. Nobody does. Never pretend you know more than everyone else. And for Duke Nukems sake, do your own research!


@Crimson

Also, this cracked article is an amusing and interesting read. It just goes to show that a lot of conspiracy theories are caused by someone’s different (and often skewed) perspective on an event.

Hahaha, you posted that article. Did you find the nutjob in the comment section who went on and on and on about how everything in the article was all lies, Cracked was working for the government and everyone was a soulless zombie sheeple? Watching him rant was as funny as the article itself. I had fun leaving my comments there

I also love that the Moon Landing conspiracy made #1.

The Moon landing is definitely my favorite conspiracy because there’s so many ways people have tried to discredit it but every single claim is so easy to debunk with a bit of science

Then when people try to tell me to prove the moon landing happened. All I need to do is show them this

It ain’t up to me to prove this is real. It’s up to you to prove it is fake

Jun 10, 2013 at 12:12AM EDT
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On the subject, though, the credibility of conspiracy theories really depends on what it’s about. It’s impossible to say that all conspiracy theories are right/wrong, because that’s just what they are: theories. ideas. The fact that they are out of line or go against a popular idea doesn’t really change what the idea in itself is about.

Jun 10, 2013 at 12:28AM EDT
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@BSOD: Actually, I didn’t bother to look in the comments section yet, but now that you mentioned that I think I will.

I don’t think I have seen anyone IRL try to prove to me the moon landing was fake, but I have run into it once or twice online and I always thought the “evidence” of the flag waving was the wost excuse for proof they could have possibly found because you can see in the footage that the flag is not actually moving and even in a still shot it is obvious the flag spread out like that from a rod running along the top.

I also know a guy who uses the term “sheeple” and I just wanna kick him every time.

Jun 10, 2013 at 12:30AM EDT
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My personal favorite group of thick headed conspiracy theorists is the “Flat World Society”, a group dedicated to the research of proving that the world is flat. Members of the Flat Earth Society claim to believe the Earth is flat. Walking around on the planet’s surface, it looks and feels flat, so they deem all evidence to the contrary, such as satellite photos of Earth as a sphere, to be fabrications of a “round Earth conspiracy” orchestrated by NASA and other government agencies.

The Flat World Society should not be confused with a joke website that goes by the same name that I would highly recommend reading because it is interesting and a piece of comedy gold.

The leading flat-earther theory holds that Earth is a disc with the Arctic Circle in the center and Antarctica, a 150-foot-tall wall of ice, around the rim. NASA employees, they say, guard this ice wall to prevent people from climbing over and falling off the disc. Earth’s day and night cycle is explained by positing that the sun and moon are spheres measuring 32 miles (51 kilometers) that move in circles 3,000 miles (4,828 km) above the plane of the Earth. (Stars, they say, move in a plane 3,100 miles up.) Like spotlights, these celestial spheres illuminate different portions of the planet in a 24-hour cycle. Flat-earthers believe there must also be an invisible “antimoon” that obscures the moon during lunar eclipses.

Furthermore, Earth’s gravity is an illusion, they say. Objects do not accelerate downward; instead, the disc of Earth accelerates upward at 32 feet per second squared (9.8 meters per second squared), driven up by a mysterious force called dark energy; this is probably the only piece of scientifically plausible information that this theory has to offer because it would simulate Earth’s gravity, but still is complete bogus.

Last edited Jun 10, 2013 at 01:11AM EDT
Jun 10, 2013 at 12:48AM EDT
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@Crimson

I’ve had plenty of people attempt to tell me the moon landing was faked.

When Fox news published their story on Bill Kaysings conspiracy and the report of it reached New Zealand, just about every kid in school took it at face value and ran around screaming “THE MOON LANDING NEVER HAPPENED! LOLOLOL STUPID AMERICANS TRYING TO FOOL TEH RUSSIANS

New Zealand was a bit anti-america at the time. They wanted to believe any dirt they heard. It was up to me to shut them up. Fortunately nobody had any argument stronger than: “It’s bullshit because I heard it on a documentary!” and had no way to counter my arguments. But most of those people still think it was faked today.

I never forgave Fox for doing that to my nations impressionable youth.


@Tim

The flat-earthers are more of a cult than conspiracists. But they definitely count as the most facepalm inducing theorists of all time.

People who believe in a flat earth are the worst kind. I’ve dealt with flat-earthers before. You simply cannot reason with them even though they can be debunked easier than the moonfakers. I’ve convinced some people that the moon landing happened but flat earthers just deny everything no matter what you say.

They never listen to anybody and just keep making the same non-sence arguments over and over and over…

Last edited Jun 10, 2013 at 01:46AM EDT
Jun 10, 2013 at 01:45AM EDT
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@Tim: I remember a few months ago seeing a video talking about the Flat Earth Society

In fact, here’s the video here

It’s funny, this almost seems more like a religion to me than a conspiracy theory. What baffles me the most is that they can’t find a reason for why NASA would be lying to us about the Earth being round. And they call gravity a “magical force” that science made up and doesn’t actually exist (because apparently if you can’t explain why something happens then it must not exist)

There are a couple of flat earth believers in the comments section of the video too, so if you want you can throw rocks at them personally ask them legitimate and respectful questions about their beliefs.

Jun 10, 2013 at 01:57AM EDT
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so if you want you can throw rocks at them personally ask them legitimate and respectful questions about their beliefs.

You get the same thing every time. Science is wrong, NASA is lying, it can’t be round because the aussies would fall off haha, the horizon looks pretty flat to me, blah blah blah.

Trust me. They are bricks walls made of granite and tungsten reinforcements

What really baffles me though is that nearly all flat-earthers I have met are deeply religious. That means that these people have no problem wholeheartedly believing in something that cannot be observed. But they have to see a round earth with their own eyes to believe it?

How can they be so sceptical of something locally because they must see it to believe it, yet fail to show that same skepticism for something beyond the universe that cannot be seen? That just blows my mind.

Last edited Jun 10, 2013 at 02:28AM EDT
Jun 10, 2013 at 02:24AM EDT
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@BSoD

Here is undeniable proof the moon landing was fake

Last edited Jun 10, 2013 at 03:49AM EDT
Jun 10, 2013 at 03:09AM EDT
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You know, I’ll show a good conspiracy just to prove not all of them are bad.

Martin Luther King and JFK were both killed by the KKK.


-BSOD

Last edited Jun 10, 2013 at 07:34AM EDT
Jun 10, 2013 at 04:27AM EDT

Bat Pug wrote:

You know, I’ll show a good conspiracy just to prove not all of them are bad.

Martin Luther King and JFK were both killed by the KKK.


-BSOD

Not the mob? The Klan are idiots and never had the recourses to pull off a Presidential Coup de tat. Plus would have made it known, “for the betterment of the white race”, so they didn’t do it.

Jun 10, 2013 at 04:53AM EDT
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I think that some may have some truth behind them, particularly the new world order trying to take over the world. It’s a simple fact that at any given point in time, there is someone who wants to rule the world. How close they are to achieving that goal is what the crazies exaggerate.
But it’ll all be for not when our lord Cthulhu wakes again

Jun 10, 2013 at 10:47AM EDT
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Bat Pug wrote:

You know, I’ll show a good conspiracy just to prove not all of them are bad.

Martin Luther King and JFK were both killed by the KKK.


-BSOD

Eh, there’s more evidence that JFK was killed by the Mafia.


I think this thread isn’t complete without a “Where’s his birth certificate?”

Jun 10, 2013 at 10:54AM EDT

Derpy Vazquez wrote:

Not the mob? The Klan are idiots and never had the recourses to pull off a Presidential Coup de tat. Plus would have made it known, “for the betterment of the white race”, so they didn’t do it.

Never had the resources? What about the ~2,000,000 Million strong Second KKK of the 1920’s?

Jun 10, 2013 at 04:36PM EDT
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The moon landings were fake. How the hell are there reflector plates you can shoot a laser at and it bounce back then?

I remember back when I was in school, we got a math problem about the moon. ANyway, basically said how big of a telescope you would need to see the stuff on the moon to prove that they actually landed on it, etc. I asked the teacher why he used that problem, cause it’s an awful problem for one, but the other thing is you can’t see shit on the moon even if you have crazy resolution and even on the clearest night you can’t see anything cause of atmospheric distortion, among other issues. He kind just looked at me and walked away. Looking back, he probably made up the problem himself because he doesn’t believe it happened.

Jun 10, 2013 at 06:14PM EDT
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Derpy Vazquez wrote:

Not the mob? The Klan are idiots and never had the recourses to pull off a Presidential Coup de tat. Plus would have made it known, “for the betterment of the white race”, so they didn’t do it.

Actually the Klu Klux clan reformed itself several times over. Irish immigrants and Jews were hated just as much as Blacks, if not more. They were also training a militia in the 1960’s at the time, which is awfully violent don’t you think?

The KKK even supported the alcohol prohibition act since a lot of Jewish immigrants relied on bar jobs for an income, and in a twist of irony created their own worst enemy the mob, which was the complete opposite of themselves.

I am basing a lot of this on a show I watch on the military channel. I can’t prove any of this, it just makes sense that if it did happen to be the KKK.

B.S.O.D, who makes citations for conspiracy theories? If I did that, it would not be a conspiracy theory.

Proof that the KKK are moon people.

Last edited Jun 10, 2013 at 10:10PM EDT
Jun 10, 2013 at 10:00PM EDT

Cale wrote:

Never had the resources? What about the ~2,000,000 Million strong Second KKK of the 1920’s?

5 million.

That’s one out of every 20 people, and that doesn’t even count Klan sympathizers.

So…the Klan was the US’s most popular club.

Jun 10, 2013 at 10:19PM EDT
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@Pug

A little bit of research makes the difference between a good theory and a crackpot one.

So that’s why I’m saying you should show us what lead to your theory

Jun 10, 2013 at 11:07PM EDT
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Blue Screen (of Death) wrote:

@Pug

A little bit of research makes the difference between a good theory and a crackpot one.

So that’s why I’m saying you should show us what lead to your theory

Because the Irish/mobsters are the cultural mortal enemies of the KKK. That is the point I am trying to make. I am not sure if that works enough.

Also, there is a conspiracy I got, there is a fairy that goes around stealing quarters and gluing them to random objects with super glue.

Last edited Jun 11, 2013 at 01:31AM EDT
Jun 11, 2013 at 01:29AM EDT
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