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Emotive Videogame moments

Last posted Oct 14, 2012 at 10:58PM EDT. Added Oct 13, 2012 at 08:47PM EDT
33 posts from 26 users

Post any moment that really made you wanna cry, made you feel extreme joy or simply reminds you of your childhood.

Here’s mine. When I beat this game with 120 stars, I felt like I could die in peace.

I’m not posting more, because some of you will post it as I expect.

Oct 13, 2012 at 08:47PM EDT
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Oh god, the memories that this brings back. It’s what got me hooked on Pokemon.

Oct 13, 2012 at 10:38PM EDT
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Holy shit, this game was my entire childhood.

When I was 5, our family had a garage sale. I knew how to read very well. My brother gave me his Gameboy Advance and Pokemon Sapphire. I didn’t know pokemon at the time, but I freaking loved it. I beat it within a week.

Oct 13, 2012 at 10:58PM EDT

Yoshi Story

I grew up with this game, i loved this as a child and had alot of great times with this, from the game over screen to the epic ending
Now, around 7 years later,I got a pc fast enough to run this game on it’s highest quality, so i slowly played it remenbering bits from my childhood, everything about this game was a precious painting to my eyes.
When i reached the ending, it was the moment where i couldn’t stop from crying, I’ve seen a great range of sad movies but i couldn’t cry, i was convinced i couldn’t cry and had a heart of solid stone, until i reached this point.
Yoshi Story may be both the good and kind side of videogames and of human emotions you usually can’t see it at first, but going futher you will find it.

Last edited Oct 13, 2012 at 11:14PM EDT
Oct 13, 2012 at 11:01PM EDT
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The ending sequence to Okami.

I was nearly in tears when Ammy realized that Issun wasn’t actually with her, was in total shock when Yami crushed and killed all of the gods within her, and was crying tears of happiness when all of the peoples prayers turned her to the Okami White Light Majesty.

This is the only game that has done that to me. The Only One!

Last edited Oct 13, 2012 at 11:53PM EDT
Oct 13, 2012 at 11:51PM EDT
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Not all the time should it be happy and relaxing.
It may be the dark depths of this game. The thought of facing this digital abomination WHILE being a child is emotionally disturbing, yet the thought of killing this “thing” is great and worthwhile.

But then even older and more mature, bringing up a creator’s childhood trauma as the fuel for the flames for the final boss makes my childhood nightmares come back with more distaste.

Saving the Earth from future alien invasion as children with physic powers feels awesome yet mildly creepy due to the last enemy faced.

Last edited Oct 14, 2012 at 12:37AM EDT
Oct 14, 2012 at 12:33AM EDT
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Ace Attorney: Trial And Tribulations was substantially filled with emotional moments, more than than the two previous games. But what surprised me was to feel sorry for the final villain, because of a sad childhood, a pair of greedy parents and the struggles for power in her whole family that turned her into a selfish heartless monster.
While not justifing her being a total bitch (eufemism), I can’t not blame the enviroment she has grew up into.
Infact her twin sister, grown up otside of that because they tried to get rid of her when she was little, became a whole better person.

Oct 14, 2012 at 02:56AM EDT
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Quite a handful of moments from Sonic DX were surprisingly quite emotional.

Oct 14, 2012 at 03:13AM EDT
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I think I’ve gotta go with the “You Are Not Alone!” scene from Final Fantasy IX (best PS1 FF BTW).

It’s mostly about the music, which is still one of my alltime favourite videogame songs. But the scene itself is very emotional too, especially when you’ve gotten attached to the characters of the story.

Oct 14, 2012 at 03:26AM EDT
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Spider-byte wrote:

All of the Noble teams deaths of halo.

Not all, IMO.

Oct 14, 2012 at 08:31AM EDT
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Please don’t embed so many videos in here, or at least spoiler them if you will. It could take longer to load the page for other users depending on their computers’ processing capabilities. Sorry if I sounded pushy or anything there, I’m just a bit concerned.

An emotional videogame moment for me?

Last edited Oct 14, 2012 at 08:40AM EDT
Oct 14, 2012 at 08:40AM EDT
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I’ve got a few, but I’ll spoiler them in case anyone wants to play the games at some point. For those who don’t care about the games being spoiled, I’ve added some explanation as to why the moments were so powerful.

I know someone else has posted this already, but I’m going to cover it all anyway.

At the very start of MGS3, you’re introduced to someone simply called ‘The Boss’. She’s Snake’s (that’s the main character) mentor, and has taught him pretty much everything he knows. The game is set in the middle of the Cold War, and Snake is involved in covert ops behind enemy lines. Right at the end of what should have been a successful mission to extract a Russian scientist out of a research facility, The Boss betrays Snake and defects to the Russians, and leads to the destruction of the research lab in a nuclear explosion. The Russians are justifiably pissed off at the nuclear explosion on their soil, and in order to prevent an all-out war, the US offers to assassinate The Boss. Of course, Snake has to be the one to do it.

Lots of other crazy shit happens in the process of trying to do this, but eventually, it comes down to a 1-on-1 between Snake and The Boss. Snake wins, and their fight ends with Snake standing over her as she helplessly asks him to kill her. To make things worse, the game gives control to you, in the middle of a cutscene, so that you have to pull the trigger on her.

In the final cutscene, you learn that she was actually acting as a double agent for the US, and she was supposed to retrieve a large sum of money from the Russians. All of it was staged, and she never really was fighting against Snake. It was her mission to die for the sake of the US, and her intention to be killed by Snake from the very start. So not only did Snake kill his mentor – the most important person in his life – she didn’t even deserve it. She was sacrificed for the sake of politics and money. The very end of the game sees Snake saluting her anonymous grave in Arlington Cemetery.

I know the internet mostly hates Call of Duty, but nothing could convince me that CoD4 was a bad game. In the first act, you alternate between playing as an SAS operative doing some secret stuff in Russia, and a US Marine fighting in some unspecified Middle-Eastern country. After quite a lot of shooting things and blowing things up, the US comes close to finding Khaled Al-Asad, some dickhead dictator type who started the war in the first place. However, while tracking him down they discover a nuclear device in his palace, and order an evacuation of all military forces from the area. That’s when this happens:

I had no idea this was coming on my first playthrough. All throughout the US missions, you’re accompanied by plenty of well armed allied soldiers, plenty of support (tanks, helicopters, airstrikes etc), and you easily gun down dozens upon dozens of hostiles with superior firepower to a backing track of heavy guitar riffs. It’s a great representation of the “fuck yeah, USA!” mentality, and it makes you feel unstoppable. Then, quite suddenly, you’re reminded of just how vulnerable you really are. You have to drag yourself out of the burning wreckage of a crashed helicopter, surrounded by the bodies of your former comrades, only to gaze upon the radioactive wreckage of the capital city before succumbing to your wounds. There is nothing you can do to avoid death. When I first saw it, it was like the developers grabbed me by the throat, and shouted “Oh, so you think war is fun, eh? Think again!”. It made me feel really uneasy for hours afterwards.

Silent Hill 2 starts with the main character, James, explaining that he was brought back to the town of Silent Hill after being given a letter from his wife. Since she’s been dead for several years, he’s kinda confused by this, and decides to check it out anyway (since I guess he didn’t have anything better to do).

Once you reach the town, you find it covered in a sheet of fog which is so thick, you can’t see more than 10 feet in front of yourself. The town seems almost completely deserted (if you don’t count the many strangely effeminate monsters), and the only human companions you find seem to be more than a little broken. Occasionally, the town shifts to more demonic version of itself, where everything is covered in rust, and things stop making sense. The game creates an incredibly oppressive atmosphere for the player, and it’s depressing as hell from start from finish (in the best possible way, of course).

Eventually, James reaches the hotel, and gains access to the room he stayed in with his wife. Then this happens:

You find that James’ wife didn’t die of a disease several years ago, but that instead, he killed her. However, he was so tormented by this that he repressed the memories, instead choosing to believe that she’d died of natural causes. On leaving the hotel room, the fog has been lifted, and you can finally see what’s around you. It’s when I suddenly realised what had been going on the entire time.

The entire town was a product of James’ mind. Absolutely everything was a metaphor. Events that made no sense initially were suddenly given meaning. The monsters were twisted representations of James’ lust for his wife, which he couldn’t satisfy after she fell ill, and the fog represented his inability to see the truth he’d been hiding from himself. One character, Maria, who follows you occasionally during the game, is killed over and over again, and that represents James reliving the memories of his wife’s death. One moment in which you find yourself traveling deeper and deeper underground through a dark, reality-defying labyrinth symbolises James’ descent into the depths of his own mind. The list goes on.

I can’t really describe the emotion I felt when I realised all of that. It was kinda depressing, to realise that the character I’d been playing as was actually an insane, depressed murderer, and that everything that had happened up to that point was a product of his own twisted mind. It was pretty overwhelming, and it’s for that reason that still call Silent Hill 2 one of my favourite games of all time.

Last edited Oct 14, 2012 at 10:11AM EDT
Oct 14, 2012 at 10:08AM EDT
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Kingdom Hearts. The whole freakin series (well, aside from some of the handheld titles) gives me incredible feels. It’s a potent mix of nostalgia and adventure.



I’m glad Natsuru brought up Okami, because basically Oki’s entire story gave me that feel.

The most surprising one to me, though, was…


Pokemon Mystery Dungeon’s story was shockingly good, even if a little juvenile. It was amazing.

Oct 14, 2012 at 10:53AM EDT
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Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door. 10/10 cutscene, would die in fight against Shadow Queen to re-watch it.
Any of the first three Harry Potter video games for the computer. Dumbledore’s always there, being so “I’m proud of you, Harry.” or “I knew you could do it!” with his charming smile and calm voice. AND THEN YOU BEAT SLYTHERIN IN THE HOUSE CUP AGAIN!! WOOOOOOOOO!!
And finally, the ending to Mario Party 6:

Oct 14, 2012 at 11:28AM EDT
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Professor Layton and the Unwound Future.
Those games have the most ridiculous plots, but they hit just the right spots, man…

Oct 14, 2012 at 01:12PM EDT
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First game to ever make me cry. In retrospect, it was probably this ending that kicked the madness that is my love for video games into full gear. I regret nothing.

Last edited Oct 14, 2012 at 02:03PM EDT
Oct 14, 2012 at 02:02PM EDT
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The wonderfully war torn, destroyed, broken setting that is Fallout 3’s Capital Wasteland.

Imagine this: the world has ended, but you’ve managed to escape the Hell on Earth by spending your entire 19 year old life in sterile isolation, surrounded by maybe twenty so other human beings. All you know is your life here. When suddenly, your father leaves the safe protection that is offered. You manage to follow after him, and as you exit your little safe haven, you’re assaulted by a bright, blinding light. Just like the manuals said. As your eyes adjust to the new found light, you see a small, dilapidated town surrounding a schoolhouse, a relic of the nuclear bombs that ravaged the earth 200 years prior.

As you spend more time exploring this broken land, you’ll come across some wonderful, and some horrible, things. A town shielded by rusted metal taken from airplanes. A large building with doors that close on their own as you look away. A small settlement made from a still intact aircraft carrier. A supermarket taken over by hostile bandits with corpses hanging from meat hooks. Pitch black metro tunnels with God-knows-what around the next corner. A sea of green trees, somehow protected from the rest of the destroyed world. A small country up north, ran by a man named Dave with its only borders being several chain link fences. The Pentagon, retrofitted to be a hideout for the protectors of this Wasteland. And the Jefferson Memorial, which has now become the best hope to save what used to be the District of Columbia.

Fallout 3 is simply a beautiful game, and the setting is probably the best part of it.

Oct 14, 2012 at 03:40PM EDT
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even if I grew up in the 2000’s, I grew up with a game from the 1990’s.
Also SMW is the best mario game for me, I felt so much joy when I finished it!

Oct 14, 2012 at 03:52PM EDT
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If you don’t want to see spoilers, don’t click play.


Right in the feels. Loved that game.

Also, I agree with cite. Fo3 was beautiful; especially the ending monologue.

Oct 14, 2012 at 03:54PM EDT
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As well as the endings to all the Mystery Dungeons.

Oct 14, 2012 at 04:42PM EDT
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You get teleported into a dystopian, authoritative future and very nearly get executed to death. I would definitely say that was the most emotive part, even over the endings. Having two or three dungeons in a row that are more or less the same – grays, blacks and ghost Pokemon – was incredibly depressing, and the whole time knowing that someone behind you legitimately wants to kill you, something I never expected from a Pokemon game. I was just waiting for it to end, but those dungeons just dragged on without result until you met Celebi.



Honestly, the whole future looking like this hit me in the feels more than the ending did.
Oct 14, 2012 at 05:20PM EDT
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ExudesAffluence wrote:

You get teleported into a dystopian, authoritative future and very nearly get executed to death. I would definitely say that was the most emotive part, even over the endings. Having two or three dungeons in a row that are more or less the same – grays, blacks and ghost Pokemon – was incredibly depressing, and the whole time knowing that someone behind you legitimately wants to kill you, something I never expected from a Pokemon game. I was just waiting for it to end, but those dungeons just dragged on without result until you met Celebi.



Honestly, the whole future looking like this hit me in the feels more than the ending did.

In my defense, I said a little juvenile.

Though you do make a good point; perhaps it wasn’t the story but the execution. I mean, there’s no mistaking the target audience. All that being said, it still blindsided me with feels.

Oct 14, 2012 at 07:16PM EDT
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Mack TheUnoriginal wrote:

In my defense, I said a little juvenile.

Though you do make a good point; perhaps it wasn’t the story but the execution. I mean, there’s no mistaking the target audience. All that being said, it still blindsided me with feels.

The first games felt a little over-dramatized, making the main character seem a bit too “chosen one” for me. It also defied logic a bit. So for all the feels, especially with the whole fugitive thing, the story was a little ludicrous and shallow at times. I feel like the first games were kinda mediocre, setting us up for really good sequels.

why would you have to defeat Rayquaza to get him to blow up the meteor? Doesn’t he have some stake in the planet not being destroyed?
Last edited Oct 14, 2012 at 09:18PM EDT
Oct 14, 2012 at 09:14PM EDT
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Since we’re on the topic of Pokemon Mystery Dungeon, I find the Gengar/Gardevoir subplot quite feelsy.Gengar goes through so much to get her back, even though he knows she won’t remember him. Perhaps it’s just nostalgia, but I prefer Blue/Red to Time/Darkness/Sky.
Then again, Grovyle pushing Dusknoir back into the time portal was pretty intense.

Oct 14, 2012 at 10:10PM EDT
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Anyone ever played minigames by jmtb02? Great stuff, especially things involving elephants. Four of his games in particular strike me as emotional: Run Elephant Run, Elephant Rave and Exit Path/Exit Path 2.

Oct 14, 2012 at 10:58PM EDT
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Skeletor-sm

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