BulletproofBrony, Ace Law Student

Conversationalist

Location: Durr Ham

Joined Nov 13, 2011 at 12:58PM EST


Contributions

Loading-blocks-red

Karma Received
+256 +280 (92%) -24 (8%)
Karma Given
+430 +464 (93%) -34 (7%)

About
I’m 22 years old and a graduate of the University of Georgia in history and political science. I recently finished my senior thesis with a research grant from the Center of Undergraduate Research Opportunities on Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Counter-Enlightenment thought. I won the 2013 Pi Sigma Alpha essay contest in UGA’s School of Public and International Affairs on the question of whether American culture tends to emphasize being an individual over being a citizen. The essay can be read here.

I am attending the Duke University School of Law. I will graduate with a Juris Doctor in 2017.

I am a prolific writer. My friend and I frequently write essays in politics, philosophy, history, and world events.

Religiously, I am a Christian as a member of the Church of Christ at Oglethorpe. I do not believe that miracles occur in the modern day, that God “speaks” to individuals in the modern day except through the Bible, or that religious belief is a justification for political policy. In fact, I believe the two should be strictly separated.

That brings us to the next section: politics. I am a capitalist. That means I believe that the only reason any government should exist is the protection of the individual rights of its citizens. In essence, I believe that each man (or woman) is the owner of himself (or herself), and that to infringe on that ownership (i.e. to violate another’s rights) is the only thing the government has the authority to regulate. Anything more than that becomes a violation of man’s self-ownership in and of itself.
Fluttershy is my favorite pony.

I find Catelyn Stark from Game of Thrones inexplicably attractive:



I’m also a fan of the Duchess of Cambridge.

My favorite movie score is from How to Train Your Dragon:



Political drama is, unsurprisingly, one of my favorite movie genres. Some of my favorite movies include Lincoln, Charlie Wilson’s War, Amazing Grace (2006), and The King’s Speech.

I think everyone should see the final Twilight movie (I went with my girlfriend -- she watches it for the lulz too) just to hear Kristen Stewart’s vampire sex talk. It’s side-splittingly hilarious.

I think Wreck-It Ralph deserved the Oscar for best animated film over Brave -- by a lot.

Even so, I love that Brave introduced me to Julie Fowlis. I want to use this song as a lullaby for future children -- it’s fantastic:



I’ll add more as I think of it, but you can also ask random questions and I may pick a few to field.

Recent Activity

Commented on 645.jpg

Caro says: More like Ike and Elincia-wannabe. Getting some of that should-have-been romance going on with an Elincia look-a-like.

I say: I’m lost. But the girlfriend gets to comment through me what she wants to comment.

Dec 21, 2014 at 06:00PM EST

Commented on 2014 Sydney Hostage Crisis

“That day, the Uber_Sydney Twitter feed announced they would be raising fares in the area to ‘encourage more drivers to come online & pick up passengers in the area’… [M]any criticized the company for increasing rates during the crisis…”

Mises says: “That shit up there. Learn it, dammit.”

Dec 19, 2014 at 01:39AM EST

Commented on Jealousy

I feel sympathy for a ball with eyes.

Dec 16, 2014 at 10:31PM EST

Uploaded an image to Kim Jong Un.

Kim Jong Un
Dec 11, 2014 at 09:30PM EST

Commented on Trying To Get My Grades Up

Save your grades?

In law school, there are no other grades but finals, and your grade on them depends not on how well you do, but how well you do relative to how all your classmates do.

I go to Duke. All my classmates are from the Ivy League. The odds are not in my favor.

Dec 08, 2014 at 10:17PM EST

Commented on Trying To Get My Grades Up

However, when I graduated from undergrad, they announced everyone who received 4.0s all four years. There were about seven. One majored in genetic engineering. It was fun to hear the silent shock of 12,000 people -- it actually made a noise.

Dec 08, 2014 at 10:09PM EST

Commented on Eric Garner's Death

He likely should be, but the Supreme Court isn’t the one that’s going to provide a remedy. There will definitely be a Section 1983 suit (the civil cause of action for the deprivation of constitutional rights under law) and a wrongful death suit, and the plaintiffs will win.

Also, the US Attorney for the Southern District of NY has jurisdiction should he decide to press federal charges. Otherwise, there will be no criminal suit, and even in the civil suit, the City of New York will be paying the bill.

However, the district attorney is elected, as is the mayor. Congress has the authority under Am. XIV, Sec. 5 to do something, should they decide to, as does the New York State Assembly, but all statutory actions would merely prevent future problems rather than remedy this one. Absent a federal prosecution, the remedies will be civil and political.

Dec 05, 2014 at 10:45PM EST

Commented on Eric Garner's Death

Though people have said it already, this is much more disturbing than the outcome in Ferguson. I think the Ferguson outcome was predictable, but this is much less likely in the normal course of justice. As I’ve said before, grand juries have an extreme prosecutorial bias, and if prosecutor loses, it means they don’t have a case. But here, my reaction is that there seems to be something else in play.

And editor people, George W. Bush actually offered his own commentary on this, and it may be worth inclusion.

As said elsewhere, indicting a police officer for an excessive use of force requires some breach in protocols. As far as I know, chokeholding someone is against NYPD protocols. And consequently, I’m very concerned about how this came out.

Dec 05, 2014 at 04:54PM EST

Commented on Don's wall

Don following back should also be a meme.

Dec 03, 2014 at 04:44PM EST

Commented on Sea-Lioning

This is a concept that needs a word.

E.g., I’ve had people (irl) come up to me and ask me what I think of Ferguson, even though anyone who knows me ought to already know the answer, and these acquaintances are invariably the ones obviously on the other side. At that point, I can’t help but to think, “Do you really not already know the answer, are you earnestly asking for my take, or do you just have a speech prepared and you want an audience?”

I love arguing -- partly why I decided to go into law. But I only enjoy it with people I can convince or are open to being convinced, or with those who can convince me. Otherwise, even I don’t much see a point, and it feels more like this:

Dec 03, 2014 at 01:01AM EST

Commented on 2014 Ferguson Riots

The laws are not enforced equally in this country. I think most here agree on that, on both sides here. E.g., though white youths use illicit drugs at analogous rates to minority youths, minority youths are systematically arrested at higher rates.

However, what is at issue is whether the entire Wilson-Brown affair is part of that trend.

I think the crime scene evidence and the pathologists’ reports are fairly conclusive, & that the grand jury process has a sufficient prosecutorial bias that, were there any case, there would’ve been an indictment.

We need criminal justice reform. I disagree that the Wilson-Brown incident is related to it.

The rioting is bad, and I don’t think trying to excuse it away is particularly helpful.

But what’s also a problem, even among the peaceful protests, is failing to distinguish between the broader issue of criminal justice reform and this incident. It’s not a disagreement that we need reform – we do – but that Michael Brown is a martyr for it. Not every use of force by the police is unjustified. Any loss of life is tragic, but it’s not always police brutality.

Focusing on Michael Brown and canonizing him as an “innocent victim of police brutality” undermines the legitimate concerns and underlying message beneath.

We all should want reform, but it needs a different rallying cry. And, as to the riots and even the “peaceful” blocking of highways and bridges, it needs a different method of communication.

Nov 28, 2014 at 06:13PM EST

Commented on 5dc.jpg

A decision to prosecute a police officer for a misuse of force requires a determination that protocols were not followed when that force was used.

I don’t know about the Gore case, but if the implication of the image is that the only possible reason for the differences between these two cases is the race of the the two officers, then that’s misleading. It’s a possible reason, but to show that, you need to look at the events in connection with the occurrences, rather than just a macro comparing the outcomes.

In the case of the Wilson case, the physical evidence (autopsy reports, photographs of the car, of the scene, etc.) and those witnesses consistent with that physical evidence (e.g., those not saying he was shot with his hands up, in the back, or “execution style” at point-blank range – which was not corroborated by the autopsy) tended to exonerate Wilson and indicate he followed procedures.

To infer racism, the evidence would have to similarly exonerate Gore of not following protocols -- i.e., their races must be the only substantive difference, indicating that was the reason for the difference in treatment.

I’m interested to see if that’s the case, but there’s a lot more to it than, “White cop not indicted; black cop charged with felony.” We have to have a deeper analysis than that.

Nov 28, 2014 at 05:31PM EST

Commented on Michael Brown's Death

That’s right. A decision to prosecute a police officer for a misuse of force requires a determination that protocols were not followed when that force was used.

I don’t know about the Gore case, but if the implication of the image is that the only possible reason for the differences between these two cases is the race of the the two officers, then that’s misleading. It’s a possible reason, but to show that, you need to look at the events in connection with the occurrences, rather than just a macro comparing the outcomes.

In the case of the Wilson case, the physical evidence (autopsy reports, photographs of the car, of the scene, etc.) and those witnesses consistent with that physical evidence (e.g., those not saying he was shot with his hands up, in the back, or “execution style” at point-blank range – which was not corroborated by the autopsy) tended to exonerate Wilson and indicate he followed procedures.

To infer racism, the evidence would have to similarly exonerate Gore of not following protocols -- i.e., their races must be the only substantive difference, indicating that was the reason for the difference in treatment.

I’m interested to see if that’s the case, but there’s a lot more to it than, “White cop not indicted; black cop charged with felony.” We have to have a deeper analysis than that.

Nov 27, 2014 at 08:03PM EST

Commented on 3b0.jpg

Tu quoque is a fallacy, not a defense.

I don’t defend any rioting, nor do I try to excuse it away by comparing it to other riots. They’re all unacceptable, as is trying to come up with an excuse for them.

Nov 26, 2014 at 01:01PM EST

'lo! You must login or signup first!