Female Masking

Female Masking

Updated Jan 08, 2014 at 08:31PM EST by Don.  

Added by Don.

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About

Female Masking, is a form of cross-dressing in which men wear wigs, masks and silicone body suits to mimic the appearance of dolls.

Origin

The female latex mask hub site Maskon[2] was launched in 1996, which hosts several webpages for female mask sellers.



Spread

On September 28th, 2003, Metafilter[7] user soundofsuburbia posted a link to the Maskon website. On November 4th, 2004, the female mask retail website PhotogenicMask[6] was launched, which includes versions in Japanese, English, Chinese and Taiwanese. On October 6th, 2006, Cross Dressers Forum[5] member whisky12 submitted a thread asking for recommendations for female latex mask sellers. On February 27th, 2007, a group photo page titled “Female mask group” was created on the photo-sharing site Flickr.[3] On June 20th, 2010, the silicone female mask retailer Celesmask[4] launched their official website. On June 29th, the Celesmask YouTube channel was created, featuring videos of the store’s products (shown below).



On January 18th, 2011, Psychology Today[8] published an article in which clinical psychologist Ray Blanchard characterized the desire to wear female latex masks as a “fetish.”

Documentary: Secrets of the Living Dolls

On December 20th, 2013, the British public-service television broadcaster Channel 4 uploaded a clip from an episode of the documentary “Secrets of the Living Dolls” (shown below), in which a man describes his experience of cross dressing and wearing female masks. On January 6th, Channel 4[10] aired the full documentary, which was watched by 2.3 million viewers. Within 48 hours, the hashtag “#livingdolls” was tweeted over 34,000 times according to the Twitter analytics sites Topsy.[9]



On the same day, Redditor ewybradyy submitted a photograph of a man wearing a female mask (shown below, left) to the /r/WTF[12] subreddit, where it received upwards of 13,000 up votes and 810 comments in the first 24 hours. On January 7th, BuzzFeed[11] highlighted several animated GIFs made from scenes in the documentary (shown below, right). In the coming days, several news sites posted articles about the documentary, including Gawker,[13] NY Daily News[14] and The Daily Dot.[15]



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