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Alejandro and I have found a question we need someone to answer.

Last posted Jun 17, 2012 at 01:10PM EDT. Added Jun 09, 2012 at 10:11PM EDT
12 posts from 11 users

Why is Good Evening taken as a Greeting but Good Night is taken as a Farewell? Night and Evening are essentially the same thing, like Hello and Hi. This has been utterly befuddling us.

Jun 09, 2012 at 10:11PM EDT
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I really don’t know. It’s kind of like the words horror and terror. Horrific means bad, but terrific means good.

Jun 09, 2012 at 10:13PM EDT
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It’s because people are weird. and stupid.

that’s why I stay inside :D. I’m the only normal one.

Jun 09, 2012 at 10:16PM EDT
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Because English. What a ridiculous language.

Jun 09, 2012 at 11:06PM EDT

Because in Ancient Greece, evening was when most festivities and parties were held, and was regarded as a time of “greeting”.

In the beginning, these celebrations of something or nothing at all went on long into the night, but then, one day, a man described by recovered texts as “the star man” (the name coming from the fact that stars only come out at night, just as he does) began a series of murders, all committed late at night.

In shock at such actions, and realising how consistently they were committed late at night, the Greek people began fleeing parties before the night grew late.

Thus, the evening was regarded as the time of “greeting”, and the night a time of departure.

Just kidding I have no idea.
Last edited Jun 09, 2012 at 11:13PM EDT
Jun 09, 2012 at 11:12PM EDT
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Why do you park on a driveway and drive on a parkway?
Why is it called a “freeway” if there is a speed limit and a road?
Why is it a tie-dye if you you use it on your shirt?
Why are round pizzas in square boxes?
Why don’t sea sponges absorb the entire ocean?
Why is there a man in the United States named Crash Bandicoot?
Why can’t I hold all these limes?
Where IS Waldo?

The world may never know…

Jun 09, 2012 at 11:14PM EDT
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Iced Hot Chocolate wrote:

Why do you park on a driveway and drive on a parkway?
Why is it called a “freeway” if there is a speed limit and a road?
Why is it a tie-dye if you you use it on your shirt?
Why are round pizzas in square boxes?
Why don’t sea sponges absorb the entire ocean?
Why is there a man in the United States named Crash Bandicoot?
Why can’t I hold all these limes?
Where IS Waldo?

The world may never know…

1. Because in each respective spot, you can be free to “Drive-away” or “Park-away”.
2. Because it’s free and paid for by the state.
3. Tie refers to the pattern of colors.
4. Squares are cheaper and easier to produce, as well as easier to handle.
5. Sea-Sponges can only retain a certain mass of water proportionate to their own.
6. Shits and giggles.
7. Your Kung-Fu is shit-tier
8. Don’t turn around.

#damnedifIreallyknow

Jun 09, 2012 at 11:22PM EDT
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Good night is like saying goodbye. You’re leaving to go to bed. Good night. Its night time and you’re leaving for the night.

I honestly don’t know. English is indeed a weird language.

Jun 09, 2012 at 11:32PM EDT
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Cale wrote:

1. Because in each respective spot, you can be free to “Drive-away” or “Park-away”.
2. Because it’s free and paid for by the state.
3. Tie refers to the pattern of colors.
4. Squares are cheaper and easier to produce, as well as easier to handle.
5. Sea-Sponges can only retain a certain mass of water proportionate to their own.
6. Shits and giggles.
7. Your Kung-Fu is shit-tier
8. Don’t turn around.

#damnedifIreallyknow

Jun 09, 2012 at 11:37PM EDT
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I can really only vouch for the “Good Night” part. You’re wishing someone to have a good rest of the night. As for “Good Evening”, next time I see you, say that as we part ways, see if it doesn’t feel awkward.

Jun 10, 2012 at 01:05AM EDT
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It’s just the traditional meaning of the respective phrases. Like Chokesmurf’s “horror” and “terror”, you may note that “worth” and “price” mean about the same thing, and yet “worthless” and “priceless” are clear opposites.

English has a number of “Good ______” phrases, and they each have specific usages, despite seeming very similar.

Good morning.
Good afternoon.
Good evening.

All of these can be used as a greeting, but also can function as a farewell in correct circumstances.

Good day.
Good night.

These are used almost exclusively as farewells, with the latter carrying to implication that one of the parties in the exchange is about to go to sleep, regardless of the time of day.

Jun 17, 2012 at 05:40AM EDT
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Zach Dragon Rage wrote:

Why is Good Evening taken as a Greeting but Good Night is taken as a Farewell? Night and Evening are essentially the same thing, like Hello and Hi. This has been utterly befuddling us.

…Because that’s exactly how I use them.

I never say Good Evening when I mean Good Night, and vice versa.

Actually, I think it’s more to do with Evening relating to the early night, and so it will be used for that tense rather than the time when you go to bed. Good Night is further into the night and so is better to use when the time is at least past dusk.

I don’t know, but that’s kinda what I think.

Last edited Jun 17, 2012 at 01:12PM EDT
Jun 17, 2012 at 01:10PM EDT
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Skeletor-sm

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