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The Internet Is Full

Last posted Jun 23, 2012 at 04:53PM EDT. Added Jun 21, 2012 at 03:25PM EDT
37 conversations with 21 participants

Tahrdan Ismeh Wu-Temporis wrote:

Your avatar is an example of what filled it up, Ric. Yes, I do blame that fanbase.

Troll posts are another example.

Jun 21, 2012 at 04:04PM EDT
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aerolyt wrote:

Troll posts are another example.

Unfortunately the good ones are rare gems amongst mountains of rocks.

Jun 21, 2012 at 04:08PM EDT
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Wasn’t there already a thread about this?

We already have a solution for this, it’s called the IPv6 address instead of the IPv4 address.

Jun 21, 2012 at 04:09PM EDT
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I don’t understand. If the computers have addresses like:

1.010101010101

Which equals just above one, then why do they equal something like

13,476,893,249

Which equals in the billions. Are the internet people just not good at math?

Jun 21, 2012 at 04:11PM EDT
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This post has been hidden due to low karma.
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Tahrdan Ismeh Wu-Temporis wrote:

Your avatar is an example of what filled it up, Ric. Yes, I do blame that fanbase.

You speakin’ for me, bub?

… Not that I mind. Just curious why you’d say something I would.

Jun 21, 2012 at 04:34PM EDT

RandomMan wrote:

Unfortunately the good ones are rare gems amongst mountains of rocks.

That would be an insult to rocks.

There will always be more room. If we run out, we can make more. Although it’s not directly applicable, I’ll cite Moore’s Law as an example.

Jun 21, 2012 at 04:41PM EDT
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I heard about this months ago. They implemented a new IP system before it even became a problem so this hype is sort of pointless.

Last edited Jun 21, 2012 at 10:43PM EDT
Jun 21, 2012 at 10:40PM EDT
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Tahrdan Ismeh Wu-Temporis wrote:

Your avatar is an example of what filled it up, Ric. Yes, I do blame that fanbase.

Hot.

Jun 21, 2012 at 10:45PM EDT
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Tahrdan Ismeh Wu-Temporis wrote:

Your avatar is an example of what filled it up, Ric. Yes, I do blame that fanbase.

I for some reason thought there was a porn site I never heard of dedicated to people making porn of me in humiliating situations that involves Gamzee, Slendy, Seal, Sui and other shippers as well…

Just the thought of it puts shivers down my spine.

Last edited Jun 21, 2012 at 10:58PM EDT
Jun 21, 2012 at 10:58PM EDT
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Tahrdan Ismeh Wu-Temporis wrote:

Your avatar is an example of what filled it up, Ric. Yes, I do blame that fanbase.

Really? A relatively small fanbase with moderate spread on the Internet? I’m pretty sure s and m fetish porn takes up way more space, why arent you complaining about that re-tardises? Honestly, I hardly run into ponies when I’m not searching for them.

Jun 22, 2012 at 01:29AM EDT
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aerolyt wrote:


Well crap.

We had a thread about this a while ago.

It’s not full anymore. They released IPv6 on June 6th, 2012; which increased the size in IP availability.

Last edited Jun 22, 2012 at 02:34AM EDT
Jun 22, 2012 at 02:26AM EDT
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Ric Tesla wrote:

I for some reason thought there was a porn site I never heard of dedicated to people making porn of me in humiliating situations that involves Gamzee, Slendy, Seal, Sui and other shippers as well…

Just the thought of it puts shivers down my spine.

Jun 22, 2012 at 02:34AM EDT
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Well as we can all see, there has not only been a thread for this before, but there have been answers provided in both and the problem is irrelevant to us now.
REQUESTIN DER LOCKIN

Jun 22, 2012 at 02:38AM EDT
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INB4 the internet fills with Ric (the Swingin Dick) Tesla’s porn
INB4 ponies and furries rape capt. serious. too late

Last edited Jun 22, 2012 at 02:43AM EDT
Jun 22, 2012 at 02:40AM EDT
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I don’t think we should lock so long as there are unanswered questions related to the topic that remain. I myself intend to answer a few of them if I can.

Jun 22, 2012 at 03:15AM EDT
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Brucker wrote:

I don’t think we should lock so long as there are unanswered questions related to the topic that remain. I myself intend to answer a few of them if I can.

While I agree that it is good to let a thread sit before locking it in case of a sudden topic boost like that, this thread is quickly becoming another Ric & Gamzee shipping thread conversation, so perhaps someone could link a solid article on this topic and then the thread could be locked from there.
Like Wikipedia’s article,
IPV5 dot com,
this introduction to IPV6,
or this quick 5 fact article.

Last edited Jun 22, 2012 at 03:28AM EDT
Jun 22, 2012 at 03:24AM EDT
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Tahrdan Ismeh Wu-Temporis wrote:

Your avatar is an example of what filled it up, Ric. Yes, I do blame that fanbase.

Those damn astronauts.

Jun 22, 2012 at 03:59AM EDT

Piano wrote:

I don’t understand. If the computers have addresses like:

1.010101010101

Which equals just above one, then why do they equal something like

13,476,893,249

Which equals in the billions. Are the internet people just not good at math?

I’m going to assume that you’re not being sarcastic, since I have a hard time telling with you.

As it happens, Internet people are very good at math, but it’s computers who are bad at it. I remember when I was young and I first became interested in computers (this was the time of Pong in the arcades, and personal computers in people’s homes were pretty much unheard of) I had assumed that computers were like glorified calculators, and math was their basic function. This is wrong.

Computers’ basic function is the examination of simple logical statements. Yes/No; True/False; On/Off; and of course, 1/0.

There’s a reason why so many things in the world of computing are counted with powers of two. The old NES game systems were 8-bit systems, then Super Nintendo was a 16-bit system, then the N64 was obviously a 64-bit system (Nintendo never made a 32-bit system, although I think some other companies did). Memory sticks for various purposes also come in these sizes: 1GB, 2GB, 4GB, 8GB, etc. All of these powers of two crop up because with computers measuring everything with ones and zeros, it makes the most sense to put everything in binary, i.e. a base-2 number system. Just as humans like to count on ten fingers and so most cultures developed a base-10 number system, so it is that computers are essentially counting on thousands of one-fingered hands. While we’re used to thinking in base-10 where we have the ones, then the tens, then the hundreds and so on, base-2 has ones, then twos, then fours, eights, sixteens, thirty-twos, sixty-fours, and one hundred twenty-eights. A base-ten digit takes any value from 0-9, but a binary digit is either a 1 or a 0; so 1+1=10, 10+10=100, and 110×1001=101010.

So due to the binary nature of computer processors and how they were developed in the early years of computing, a standard of memory was established to be a “byte”. A byte was eight “bits” where a bit was essentially an on/off switch in the computer’s processor or memory. Eight bits meant that a byte could store a value from 0 to 255, and pretty much everything in computing came in byte-sized chunks. A maximum value of 255 may not seem like much, but it’s of course enough to enumerate all of the ASCII character set, which is all the average English-speaking user ever needs. Also, it turned out that IPv4, or four bytes of info was enough to enumerate all the Internet addresses anyone needed until apparently February of last year. This may sound surprising, but since those four bytes can have about 4.3 billion different values, that’s nearly enough to give every human on earth their own number, certainly enough for every human who currently has Internet access I imagine.

So mathematically, how do we go from those strings of zeros and ones to those dotted “192.168.0.1”-type addresses to ten-digit numbers? I’ll use KnowYourMeme.com’s address as an example, which is commonly expressed as

208.85.144.97

To a computer, this is 11010000 01010101 10010000 01100001. You can think of this conversion like this:

1×128
1×64
0×32
1×16
0×8
0×4
0×2
0×1
----- (adds up to)
208

The chunking of the number into bytes essentially makes it easier to read than to convert the whole number into base-10, which would be:

3,495,268,449

Hopefully, that makes some sense. Interestingly, Internet people have made a bold and smart move to skip over IPv5 to IPv6. While a five-byte address allows for 1,099,511,627,775 unique values, and that would probably last us a long, long time, they realized that with the growth of technology, information, and population, we might as well toss in one more byte to allow for 281,474,976,710,655 values which will last us for any likely foreseeable future. (If the earth had 10 billion people on it, and the average person owned 20 thousand electronic devices, we could label them all, and still have plenty left over.)

Jun 22, 2012 at 04:23AM EDT
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Derpy Vazquez wrote:

INB4 Brucker explains p0rn on the interwebs

Oh, am I supposed to do that next? I could go there, you know, as what Ric said is actually not just a silly joke; I think one can make a case for porn being a major factor in the using up of Internet addresses as a very interesting case of social dynamics.

Jun 22, 2012 at 04:28AM EDT
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Brucker wrote:

Oh, am I supposed to do that next? I could go there, you know, as what Ric said is actually not just a silly joke; I think one can make a case for porn being a major factor in the using up of Internet addresses as a very interesting case of social dynamics.

Jun 22, 2012 at 04:39AM EDT
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“The Web brings people together because no matter what kind of a twisted sexual mutant you happen to be, you’ve got millions of pals out there. Type in ‘Find people that have sex with goats that are on fire’ and the computer will ask, ‘Specify type of goat.’ " --George Costanza

Jun 22, 2012 at 05:38AM EDT
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Speaking of the processing of ones and zeroes, did everyone see today’s Google Doodle? Very fun, IMO.

Jun 23, 2012 at 01:35AM EDT
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Tahrdan Ismeh Wu-Temporis wrote:

Your avatar is an example of what filled it up, Ric. Yes, I do blame that fanbase.

Your right! All of those Orks using up our precious internet!

Greedy bastards…

Jun 23, 2012 at 01:57AM EDT

IP systems won’t work, A FREEWAY WILL!

LET’S PUT MORE FREEWAYS!

We’re screwed.

Jun 23, 2012 at 04:49AM EDT

Brucker wrote:

Speaking of the processing of ones and zeroes, did everyone see today’s Google Doodle? Very fun, IMO.

Jun 23, 2012 at 05:04AM EDT
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Mexx Android wrote:

Your right! All of those Orks using up our precious internet!

Greedy bastards…

Oi’! Yo’ ‘ummies been hacin’ da internetz ‘ong enouf!!!
*IT’Z TIM’ TO MAKE IT ORKY!!!*

“Back in my day, ruling the internet meant something.”

But we’re takkin it f’om ye’ ‘ands. Yo’ve ‘ut up a’ gud enuf fight!!! We’e let ye’ live.

’N WARD BOYZ!!!

Jun 23, 2012 at 12:41PM EDT
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Ric Tesla wrote:

Oi’! Yo’ ‘ummies been hacin’ da internetz ‘ong enouf!!!
*IT’Z TIM’ TO MAKE IT ORKY!!!*

“Back in my day, ruling the internet meant something.”

But we’re takkin it f’om ye’ ‘ands. Yo’ve ‘ut up a’ gud enuf fight!!! We’e let ye’ live.

’N WARD BOYZ!!!

If it’s a war you want Ric… THEN IT"S A WAR YOU SHALL RECEIVE!

MEN, ATTACK!

(Now a bit of music)



Jun 23, 2012 at 12:50PM EDT

ORKZ ‘RE MENT FO’ ROCKIN!!!

(Okay let’s take this to our walls).

Last edited Jun 23, 2012 at 01:04PM EDT
Jun 23, 2012 at 01:03PM EDT
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Derpy Vazquez wrote:

01001001001000000110001101100001011011100010000001101000011000010111101000100000011000110110100001100101011001010111101001100010011101010111001001100111011001010111001000111111

Jun 23, 2012 at 01:48PM EDT
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404 user not found wrote:


I heard about this months ago. They implemented a new IP system before it even became a problem so this hype is sort of pointless.

Indeed.

Sips Black Tea.

Jun 23, 2012 at 02:51PM EDT
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Brucker wrote:

01001001001000000110001101100001011011100010000001101000011000010111101000100000011000110110100001100101011001010111101001100010011101010111001001100111011001010111001000111111

01111001 01100101 01110011 00100000 01111001 01101111 01110101 00100000 01100011 01100001 01101110 00100000 01101000 01100001 01111010 00100000 01100011 01101000 01100101 01100101 01111010 01100010 01110101 01110010 01100111 01100101 01110010 00111111

Jun 23, 2012 at 04:46PM EDT
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Brucker wrote:

I’m going to assume that you’re not being sarcastic, since I have a hard time telling with you.

As it happens, Internet people are very good at math, but it’s computers who are bad at it. I remember when I was young and I first became interested in computers (this was the time of Pong in the arcades, and personal computers in people’s homes were pretty much unheard of) I had assumed that computers were like glorified calculators, and math was their basic function. This is wrong.

Computers’ basic function is the examination of simple logical statements. Yes/No; True/False; On/Off; and of course, 1/0.

There’s a reason why so many things in the world of computing are counted with powers of two. The old NES game systems were 8-bit systems, then Super Nintendo was a 16-bit system, then the N64 was obviously a 64-bit system (Nintendo never made a 32-bit system, although I think some other companies did). Memory sticks for various purposes also come in these sizes: 1GB, 2GB, 4GB, 8GB, etc. All of these powers of two crop up because with computers measuring everything with ones and zeros, it makes the most sense to put everything in binary, i.e. a base-2 number system. Just as humans like to count on ten fingers and so most cultures developed a base-10 number system, so it is that computers are essentially counting on thousands of one-fingered hands. While we’re used to thinking in base-10 where we have the ones, then the tens, then the hundreds and so on, base-2 has ones, then twos, then fours, eights, sixteens, thirty-twos, sixty-fours, and one hundred twenty-eights. A base-ten digit takes any value from 0-9, but a binary digit is either a 1 or a 0; so 1+1=10, 10+10=100, and 110×1001=101010.

So due to the binary nature of computer processors and how they were developed in the early years of computing, a standard of memory was established to be a “byte”. A byte was eight “bits” where a bit was essentially an on/off switch in the computer’s processor or memory. Eight bits meant that a byte could store a value from 0 to 255, and pretty much everything in computing came in byte-sized chunks. A maximum value of 255 may not seem like much, but it’s of course enough to enumerate all of the ASCII character set, which is all the average English-speaking user ever needs. Also, it turned out that IPv4, or four bytes of info was enough to enumerate all the Internet addresses anyone needed until apparently February of last year. This may sound surprising, but since those four bytes can have about 4.3 billion different values, that’s nearly enough to give every human on earth their own number, certainly enough for every human who currently has Internet access I imagine.

So mathematically, how do we go from those strings of zeros and ones to those dotted “192.168.0.1”-type addresses to ten-digit numbers? I’ll use KnowYourMeme.com’s address as an example, which is commonly expressed as

208.85.144.97

To a computer, this is 11010000 01010101 10010000 01100001. You can think of this conversion like this:

1×128
1×64
0×32
1×16
0×8
0×4
0×2
0×1
----- (adds up to)
208

The chunking of the number into bytes essentially makes it easier to read than to convert the whole number into base-10, which would be:

3,495,268,449

Hopefully, that makes some sense. Interestingly, Internet people have made a bold and smart move to skip over IPv5 to IPv6. While a five-byte address allows for 1,099,511,627,775 unique values, and that would probably last us a long, long time, they realized that with the growth of technology, information, and population, we might as well toss in one more byte to allow for 281,474,976,710,655 values which will last us for any likely foreseeable future. (If the earth had 10 billion people on it, and the average person owned 20 thousand electronic devices, we could label them all, and still have plenty left over.)

The Gameboy Advance was a 32-bit system.

Jun 23, 2012 at 04:53PM EDT
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Skeletor-sm

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