Starbucks Drake Hands

Starbucks Drake Hands

Part of a series on Drake. [View Related Entries]

Updated Aug 01, 2014 at 07:04PM EDT by Brad.

Added Oct 08, 2013 at 12:52PM EDT by amanda b..

Entry
Like us on Facebook!

PROTIP: Press 'i' to view the image gallery, 'v' to view the video gallery, or 'r' to view a random entry.

This submission is currently being researched & evaluated!

You can help confirm this entry by contributing facts, media, and other evidence of notability and mutation.

About

#StarbucksDrakeHands is an Instagram hashtag associated with a series of videos in which people silently gaze at the camera while rapper Drake’s “Hold On, We’re Going Home” plays in the background.

Origin

On October 1st, 2013, Californian model Piper Kennedy[2] reluctantly gave her phone number to a local barista Brody “Odag” Ryan Curtis. The next day, Brody texted her a short video of himself silently smiling and rubbing his right hand on his face with the Drake song “Hold On, We’re Going Home” playing in the background as an attempt to seduce her. That same day, her friend DJ Ben Roc posted the video to his Instagram[1] account, where it gained more than 1,100 likes in six days.



Spread

On October 3rd, Roc uploaded the first parody video, attributed to Instagram user Alex Orley[3] (shown below), which received more than 110 likes within five days. As he began to receive more parody videos on Instagram, he launched the hashtag #StarbucksDrakeHands[6] to keep track of them all. On October 4th, Redditor theknocksnyc submitted Ben Roc’s Instagram video to the /r/Cringe subreddit[4] where it gained 24 upvotes, 19 points overall and 5 comments within four days. The following day, the video was re-uploaded to YouTube[5], accruing more than 110,000 views in 72 hours.



On October 7th, the official Instagram[8] and Twitter[9] accounts for #StarbucksDrakeHands were launched by Champlain College student Mike Miller, who also uploaded a compilation of the parodies onto YouTube that same day. Meanwhile, BuzzFeed[7] posted a collection of the Instagram parody videos and local news site PIX 11[10] also reported on the emerging trend. On October 8th, news of the video fad spread to a number of entertainment blogs and internet culture sites including the Daily Mail[11], the Hollywood Gossip[12], International Business Times[13], Metro UK[14], First Post[15] and RyanSeacrest.com.[16] The same day, RyanSeacrest.com[2] also posted a series of photos of Kennedy (shown below), the woman who inspired the videos. Additional examples can be found on Instagram[6], YouTube[17] and Twitter.[18]



Notable Examples




Search Interest



External References

Recent Videos 13 total

Recent Images 4 total

Top Comments


+ Add a Comment

Comments 28 total

Loading-blocks-red

+ Add a Comment

Add a Comment

Hauu! You must login or signup first!