One Weird Trick / Doctors Hate Him / Her Dermatologists Hate Him / Her Meme Example

One Weird Trick / Doctors Hate Him

Part of a series on Online Advertisement. [View Related Entries]

Updated Mar 12, 2020 at 05:37AM EDT by andcallmeshirley.

Added Mar 10, 2020 at 02:31PM EDT by Zach.

PROTIP: Press 'i' to view the image gallery, 'v' to view the video gallery, or 'r' to view a random entry.

About

One Weird Trick / Doctors Hate Him refers to a popular culture trope that’s frequently used in online advertisements dating back to the late 2000s, especially with clickbait, chumbox or pop-up ads. This trope has been parodied in jokes across the internet in the form of countless memes and shares many similarities to the Trainers Hate Him format.

Origin

Though the exact origin of these “One Weird Trick” and “Doctors Hate Him” advertisements is unknown, they began appearing online as early as the late 2000s. Appearing at the end of articles or on sidebars with a specific grid-style layout, these types of advertisements are commonly referred to as clickbait, chumbox or chumbucket and have been found on sites ranging from media publications like Daily Mail to New York Magazine. Though some of these ads appear to lead back nowhere, companies such as Barton Publishing, Taboola and Outbrain are some of the most prominent creators of such content.


Sponsored by Do THIS Before Eating Carbs (Every Time) New Diabetes Discovery Leaves Doctors Speechless Odd Trick Destroys Erectile Dysfunction 1 Weird Food That What the Bible Says About Money (Fascinating) Yoga Pants Fails Of The Eats Your Diabetes Rich And Infamous Reverse Your Diabetes Hidden Playbook Newsmax

Particularly popular in the early 2010s, these types of ads were prominent on journalism-based websites as an additional form of revenue and are often accompanied by clickbait terms like “15 hot celebs who dress too scandalously” or “Around the Web,” featuring poorly drawn illustrations, grotesque images or lewd photos to attract visitors. Though these chumbox ads began to fall out of fashion in the latter half of the 2010s, their pervasiveness online during the heyday has continued to maintain their relevance in online culture.

Spread

Over the years since these ads were commonplace, users across numerous sites and communities have created their own versions to mock the trope, typically mimicking their style and layout with the phrasal templates “One Weird Trick” and “X Hate Him/Her” with any type of expert for a particular field.

One of the earliest examples can be seen on Cheezburger[1] in the form of a demotivational poster (seen below) posted on December 2nd, 2011, by user chaffie. This meme uses the commonly seen “Dermatologists Hate Her” phrase featured in numerous parody ads.


DERMATOLOGISTS HATE HER For Discovering $5 WRINKLE TRICK From Home LEARN HOW YOU CAN TOO! IS IT SEMEN? I bet it's semen. VERY DEMOTIVATIONAL .com

Another popular style of such memes is Trainers Hate Him, which parodies a series of Force Factor ads from the early 2010s. One such meme was uploaded to Flickr[2] on May 16th, 2013, by user kadigan featuring a painting of the fictional character Popeye by DeviantArt[3] Artist axlsalles.

On October 17th, 2015, Twitter[4] user Smosh reposted another variant of this meme with a picture of Ash Ketchum from Pokemon (shown below) and received 920 likes and 230 retweets.


Using the phrase “One Weird Trick,” Redditor[5] mcnuccy posted a version of the meme on November 8th, 2017, to the r/MemeEconomy sub (seen below) where it was upvoted nearly 9,000 times.


Doctors I fear no man. One Weird Trick Doctors Doctors1 But that thing it scares me.

On April 26th, 2017, Imgur[6] user Schadenfreuda uploaded another example under the title “Mostly Tasteless Star Wars Memes Volume IV” that included a “Doctors Hate Him!” meme depicting Chancellor Palpatine alongside a reference to “One Weird Trick.” The post (seen below) garnered 2,064 views and 62 points.


Doctors Hate Him! He went from 88 years old in 1983 to 52 years old in 1999 and learned to save the ones you love using this ONE WEIRD TRICK PLEDGE YOURSELF NOW

Various Examples


1 Weird Trick DESTROYS Erectile Dysfunction WATCH VIDEO NOW Banks Hate Him! See how he made $10,000 in an afternoon with one simple trick ROMANS HATE HIM! He wiped out 75,000 soldiers at Cannae Learn how to defeat armies twice the size of your own with this ONE WEIRD TRICK LEARN THE TRUTH NOW

Doctors hate him. Local man cures depression in one simple mindblowing trick: DOCTORS HATE HIM! Find out how he saved thousands of POKéMON dollars using this simple trick. LEARN THE TRUTH NOVW DOCTORS HATE HIM In just 2 episodes, this dog got cute FIND OUT HOW Click here

Template


Hate Him! exposes shocking anti-aging secret. Learn this one WEIRD trick to his stunning results! Local LEARN THE TRUTH NOW

Search Interest

External References

[1] Cheezburger – Pokemon

[2] Flickr – kadigan

[3] Deviant Art – The Sailor

[4] Twitter – smosh

[5] Reddit – r/MemeEconomy

[6] Imgur – BeqQn

Recent Videos 1 total

Recent Images 41 total


Top Comments

Gumshoe
Gumshoe

Can't believe this took so long to get an entry. As a side note, I never understood the market for these garbage spam ads. We now live in a time when most people are wary enough to recognise obvious clickbait and spam in ads and pop-ups. A lot of places like Facebook and Instagram have adjusted to this with targeted ads for products that might actually interest you (which in my experience, has kind of worked), and by making ads look less and less like ads.

But for some reason, news websites seem to still have this junk around the edges, and I don't know why or who is profiting off it. Even on things where you assume the audience is relatively sophisticated, or covering important worldly issues, you still see junk news spam from places like Taboola with headlines like "look how ugly these 15 celebrities look" or "how you can make $500,000 this month" with a picture of a model inside a private jet. I get that there's always someone who will click on this crap if enough people see it, but I don't see how its high enough to actually fund the websites doing it, or where these clickbait providers get their own money from.

+16

+ Add a Comment

Comments (7)


Display Comments

Add a Comment


Namaste! You must login or signup first!