Low quality black and white police sketch

Erratas

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About

"Erratas" (Sometimes spelled as "Eratas" to avoid detection) is the name of a supposed computer algorithm, which is utilized by major corporations worldwide. This algorithm may be used to remove copyright infringement on websites such as YouTube, and can be seen as a form of mass surveillance. The mystery shrouding "Erratas" comes from how employees of certain companies are supposedly fired if the algorithm's name shows up in their file search history, and how "Erratas" seems to target and delete any mention of it's name online. The word "Erratas" (Plural) or "Errata" means "Error" or "Printing mistake" in Latin. Some suggest that the "Erratas" mystery is just an Alternate Reality Game (ARG) or random coincidences. The mysteries and connections have since spurred a series of complicated conspiracy theories.

Origin

On November 25th, 2015, an anonymous user on 4chan posted in the /x/ board a summary of a conversation with a woman about how she was given a "shady" factory job by a temporary employment agency. The post[1] goes on to say that she picked up a tape gun with the word "Erratas" (Misspelled as "Eratas") written on it instead of a normal factory department's name. She was told by a co-worker to get rid of it and to never mention the odd name to any supervisors. The co-worker explains that anybody who searched on their computers for the name was "flagged" and fired immediately.

The post reads:

They had a programming department that made payroll programs for other companies or something along those lines, but by the time she got there it was just literally one dude, and they were giving him random jobs to do like working assembly lines and running forklifts. They put her and this dude in a room, gave them a couple tape guns, and had them pack stuff in boxes. Most stuff there had the names of their respective departments written on them in sharpie, but hers said "Eratas" on it (or however the fuck it's spelled). The dude told her to get rid of the tape gun and not to mention it to any supervisors, since apparently one of his jobs years before had been writing code to flag any employee that searched for it in their computer system. Not any old word, just that one. And they'd fire you if you got flagged. Weird shit.


Anonymous Thu 26 Nov 2015 01:26:23 No.17010929 Quoted By >17011003 >17011066 >>17012016 >>17024796 Report 17010848 Okay, just a heads-up, I'm only 20 and have only ever worked retail jobs my whole life. IFI get terminology wrong it's not because I'm bullshitting, it's because most of what she described is out of my frame of reference, l be honest. She's a super interesting chick, during this period she was homeless and in a band. Her temp agency gave her a job at this place that was closing down all their locations in the country and basically it was well-known that they were shady and generally treated their employees like cattle. Like they were in the process of cutting down all their full-timers to s--- hours, replacing them with temps, and having the temps do exactly the same work for like $10 an hour. Everything was really disorganized by this point and different departments were scattered everywhere and they were just getting everyone to do whatever work they could give them before they'd fire them. They had a programming department that made payroll programs for other companies or something along those lines, but by the time she got there it was just literally one dude, and they were giving him random jobs to do like working assembly lines and running forklifts. They put her and this dude in a room, gave them a couple tape guns, and had them pack stuff in boxes. Most stuff there had the names of their respective departments written on them in sharpie, but hers said Eratas" on it (or however the f--- it's spelled). The dude told her to get rid of the tape gun and not to mention it to any supervisors, since apparently one of his jobs years before had been writing code to flag any employee that searched for it in their computer system. Not any old word, just that one. And they'd fire you if you got flagged. Weird s---

Spread

Less than one month later, on December 19th, another anonymous user posted about "Erratas." They wrote,[2] "Did anyone here have any software/IT jobs on the east coast between 2000 and 2010 or so? I ask because a few people I know from that time and area have talked about some sort of sketchy HR-related program called 'Erratas,' and I'm wondering if I can find any information about it."

A month later, on December 19, 2015, another anon posted a question that asked if anyone worked in IT from 2000 to 2010 to find out about some "sketchy program" they've heard of from locals, and mentions the name "Erratas" again. A few companies were named that may use the program, such as UPS.


[8/1 Anonymous Sat 19 Dec 2015 17:30:15 View Reply Original Report No.17105303 Quoted By: >>17105436 Did anyone here have any software/IT jobs on the east coast between 2000 and 2010 or so? I ask because a few people I know from that time and area have talked about some sort of sketchy HR-related program called "Erratas", and I'm wondering if I can find any information about it. Not strictly paranormal-related, but disturbing, and I believe I saw someone on /x/ mention it before. So if that anon is here, please post. 187KIB, 673x900, FACELIFT.jpg| View Same Google iqdb SauceNAO Trace

Discovery of ChronosForLife

A post was made in /mu/ on January 25th, 2016 from a user who wanted to create a new genre of music called "Deep Internet". Music in this genre would be comprised of snippets and noise from very obscure YouTube videos. A set of links accompanied the description, and one of them led to a YouTube video titled "Youtube is MONITORING and controlling my life." The video was uploaded on January 23th, 2016 by a channel named "ChronosForLife JurassicPark". In it, the distressed uploader talks about how Youtube and it's "algorithms" are targeting him and his deceased mother's tribute videos to the Jurassic Park movies.

This channel uploaded another video titled "Here goes nothing…", which claims to be bait for the "Er****s" (Erratas) algorithm to flag and delete (screenshot, below). The description reads: "If it flags this one, that's some spooky shit."

Soon after the post's discovery, some discovered that if they turned on YouTube's Automatic Captions feature, which known to create sentences out of normal speech and cannot be altered by the uploader or YouTube, an address that reads "200 Corbin KY 40219" is written in the captions at one point in the video. This is the address listed on the Bandcamp page of "KFC Murder Chicks," which was later removed.


are far from over 200 Corbin KY 40219 Here goes nothing.. ChronosForLife JurassicPark AMERICA Puline Subscribe 66 1,841

Another discovery in one of his other videos came in a morse code message near the end of his "Jurassic Park 3 Tribute Re-Upload" video. When translated, the message reads: "Hollywood Astral Projection Clinic." No explanation has currently been found for this message.

ChronosForLife uploaded a Q&A video where they answered questions in the comments sections of his other videos, but it has since been taken down. However, an anon managed to write a transcript of the video.[4]

In the transcript, ChronosForLife describes Erratas: " All I really know about Erratas is that it's used by dozens of companies. ("recent", as in, within the last 5 or 6 years) they seem to use it as a copyright-enforcement tool which works as an excellent [?] if you want to take down other things as well."

Same Anon here, I just finished typing out a transcript of the video as best I could, and I have to say, things are getting weird. A lot of what he says matches up perfectly with the little that's mentioned about Erratas in the archived /x/ threads.
If anyone is able to figure out what the text said at parts where I wasn't able to, that'd be great.
Notes about the transcript: Anything in square brackets are my own notes; " ] " means I couldn't read multiple words, or that I couldn't tell if it was multiple words or not and I couldn't read them; " [?] " means I couldn't read what I'm pretty sure is just one word; [?] attached to the end of a word means I'm not completely sure that that's what that word says; [ attached to other letters means I could figure out part of the word but part of I couldn't figure out.

TRANSCRIPT:
[start of video]
I've been fairly reluctant to really ask anyone for help since the nature of ] like pre[ classic paranoid nutjob ramblings -
algorithms controlling things behind the scenes, weird stuff in that vein.
But I would never waste anyone's time with stuff like that. In the past couple of years I've asked for help from friends in programming and business circles.
but over time, friendships fade, people move, people stop talking to you. You know the drill.
As such, I'm very grateful for the help people are giving and I'll try and answer as many questions as I can here.
Cork Top writes:
Q: "So with this video, are you essentially trying to see if this system called "Erratas" or "Eratas" will attempt to take down the video because it's some system/algorithm that takes down videos that… I don't know, include the term "Eratas"/"Erratas" in them? Which is why you used asterisks for letters in the word in the description, to see if the system could detect text on videos?"
[Cont…]

A: Thanks for writing, Cork. Yes. I don't know much about programming or computer systems, so I'm not too savvy about how to trick them. All I really know about Erratas is that it's used by dozens of companies.
("recent", as in, within the last 5 or 6 years)
they seem to use it as a copyright-enforcement tool which works as an excellent [?] if you want to take down other things as well.
But it has its limitations, and I'm fairly sure that my "test video" helped ferret those out. Maybe.
The original Jurassic Park trilogy is excellent, by the way, I highly recommend it.
The second film is my favorite, in spite of its flaws.
Frank Horrigan writes "what is the erratas system? any documentation?"
A: Thanks ]ing, Frank. "Erratas"[?] is something I [?(I'm not sure if there's a word here or not)] crossed paths with over the years, and in[scope[?] disturb[??(this word MIGHT be "disturbance," or it might be "disturbs me")] …
The fact that it went after my mom in her twilight years is either evidence of its enormous and uncaring[?] reach in other words, a coincidence, or it means it's
specifically still coming after me after all these years, and to be frank, both options freak me out equally.
3M and Unilever were early adopters, which shows the versatility of the system.
Too much faith is put into computers in general, and WAY too much faith was put in Erratas. Lots of people lost their jobs.
And Aaron4420 [referring to a YouTuber who posted on one of his videos], it's easy to talk shit from behind a computer screen but takes a real man to back it up so suck my dick through a straw
[end]


Tod Ellsworth's Youtube Channel & Twitter Posts

A channel by the name of Tod Ellsworth[3] uploaded a video on November 21, 2015. Its content is a song by the band "KFC Murder Chicks." In the description, the phrase "Erratas or Rusts" is written at the end of the description.

Tod Ellsworth also has a Twitter page.[4] On it, only three posts have been made by "him." The first one is an image of a computer-generated police sketch of a suspected Maui rapist (shown below).


Tod Ellsworth @Eratas OrBust 20 Nov 2015

Connections with ChronosForLife have been suggested after discovering that "Tod Ellsworth" is an anagram for "The Lost World" as in the sequel to the film Jurassic Park, The Lost World: Jurassic Park.

"KFC Murder Chicks"'s Bandcamp Page

The Bandcamp page of "KFC Murder Chicks" has long since disappeared. On it, there were odd paragraphs of text and a reference to "Tod Ellsworth"'s name.

When questioned about "Erratas" on their Tumblr, they seemingly confused the name with a Yu-Gi-Oh spell card. However, when asked about their dislike for the post office, they say they're against the post office due to them being tied to "spying and profiling". A post on Tod Ellsworth's Twitter page describes something similar, mentioning the Postal Service and how it's supposedly linked to the "Deep Web".

And lastly, when asked about their favorite movie, they answered with: "I've always been a fan of the carnosaur movies." Some have speculated to be another link to ChronosForLife.

A video by the YouTuber blameitonjorge made further connections, stating that the band was "homeless girl band" and that one of the members worked in a warehouse, much like the woman described in the original 4chan post.

Takedown of Exer Erb's Youtube Channel

"Exer Erb" was a fairly new channel with a video on "Erratas" that explained the mystery and it's origins very well. However, their channel was later taken down by YouTube and has not resurfaced. An uploader named "Toxicologist" has a video, which discusses Exer Erb's sudden disappearance (shown below).



Anons Banned By 4chan For Discussing "Erratas"

Midway through April 2016, threads about "Erratas" were reportedly deleted and anons who tried to discuss "Erratas" were banned, leading some to believe that "Erratas" was installed on 4chan and is trying to delete threads mentioning it. One anon was banned for "Copyright Infringement," despite the fact that copyrighted material is frequently featured on 4chan.

Since then, that group of anons has moved to a thread on 8chan.

The term "Errata'd" is an in-joke here that's said whenever something is believed to be affected by Erratas's work.

blameitonjorge Video

On September 7th, 2019, YouTuber blameitonjorge published the video "Erratas: The Mysterious Word You Shouldn't Search For." Within six days, the video received more than 541,000 views (shown below).



Search Interest

External References

[1] 4chan – /x/

[2] 4chan – /x/

[3] YouTube – Todd Elisworth

[4] Pastebin – Chronosforlife Answering Questions Transcript

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Recent Images 6 total


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